Fun Facts Friday: Captain Frederick Marryat

Captain Frederick Marryat (10 July, 1792 – 9 August, 1848) was a Royal Navy officer, and a novelist who pioneered historical naval fiction.

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Book Review: How to Lose the Information War by Nina Jankowicz

I have to give Ms. Jankowicz credit for not taking sides and attempting to be as bipartisan as possible. She writes about how many entities on the political spectrum in the US embrace Russian disinformation tactics to their advantage.

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Book Review: The Atlantis World by A.G. Riddle

I really enjoyed the overall premise to he series, but in this last book I’m not sure what the author wanted to convey, or if he had a trilogy planned out at all. It seemed like a bunch of story-lines thrown together for good measure, crossing fingers they would somehow work and make sense.

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Fun Facts Friday: M.F.K. Fisher

M.F.K. Fisher (3 July, 1908 – 22 June, 1992) was a food writer and translator. Ms. Fisher believed that eating well was one of the “arts of life”

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Book Review: The Revelators by Ace Atkins

The story revolves around Mexicans getting deported from a chicken plant, in an inhuman way which separates them from their children. Some children were kidnapped by gangs, getting sold to into the sex trade. What that, and several other subplots have to do with Quinn’s assassination attempt you’ll have to read for yourself.

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Book Review: The Atlantis Plague by A. G. Riddle

The second book in The Origin Mystery trilogy, a science-fiction story following a genealogist out to save the human race from the brink of extinction.

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Fun Facts Friday: Charlotte Zolotow

Charlotte Zolotow (26 June, 1915 – 19 November, 2013) was a prolific writer of children books, editor and poet. Mrs. Zolotow was a prolific children book author who did not shy away from examining difficult subjects.

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Book Review: The Last Sword Maker by Brian Nelson

To my surprise, this techno-fiction book became, about half way in, a world spanning espionage and intrigue story. Everything is drive, of course, by this new technology that would set the world into a new age that everyone wants to get their hands on.

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Book Review: Lift by Daniel Kunitz

Book Review: Lift by Daniel Kunitz

The author’s narrative is dry at times, but it was tight and well written. The issue I have with this book is that I felt cheated after starting to read.

Fun Facts Friday: Emma Lazarus

Fun Facts Friday: Emma Lazarus

Emma Lazarus (22 July, 1849 – 19 November, 1887) was an American poet known for her 1883 sonnet The New Colossus which is inscribed on a bronze plaque being held by the Statue of Liberty. By T. Johnson – The New York Historical Society [1][2], Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=275227 1)      Ms. Lazarus was one of seven […]

Book Review: Harem by Alev Lytle Croutier

Book Review: Harem by Alev Lytle Croutier

The author writes about how harems worked, the occupants and the politics of them.

Excerpt from Unholy Code by Thomas Waite

Excerpt from Unholy Code by Thomas Waite

Acclaimed novelist Thomas Waite shares this short excerpt from Unholy Code, the latest thriller in his Lana Elkins series.   “Look at the water, boy.” Vinko peered at its smooth surface and saw his reflection. “Your face is white as the clouds, isn’t it? Just like everyone else you see around here.” Vinko understood. He’d never […]

Fun Facts Friday: Clement Clarke Moore

Fun Facts Friday: Clement Clarke Moore

Mr. Moore was an ardent opponent and protested against the development of the street grid as proposed by the government of New York. He thought it was a conspiracy to increase political patronage and appease the working class.

Book Review: The Book of Aron by Jim Shepard

Book Review: The Book of Aron by Jim Shepard

This is not an uplifting book, but it is a very interesting story and about a young boy, in his formative years living in the Warsaw Ghetto

Book Review: Hitman Anders and the Meaning of It All by Jonas Jonasson

Book Review: Hitman Anders and the Meaning of It All by Jonas Jonasson

This is a fun book, a great satire and a good read

Fun Facts Friday: Charles Reade

Fun Facts Friday: Charles Reade

Charles Reade (8 June, 1814 – 11 April, 1884) was an English dramatist and novelist. Mr. Read is best known for his novel The Cloister and the Hearth. “Charles Reade,” (1872)  illustrated by Frederick Waddy (1848–1901)  WorldCat – archive.org, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=12460317 1)      Mr. Reade considered himself a dramatist and wanted that be firs on […]

Graphic Novel Review: James Bond: Vargr by Warren Ellis and Jason Masters

Graphic Novel Review: James Bond: Vargr by Warren Ellis and Jason Masters

James Bond, agent 007 of British Secret Service, returns to London from a vengeance mission in Helsinki and resumes the boring duties of the 00 section. Soon enough he gets a new mission, this time in Berlin to break a drug trafficking cartel.

Book Review: The Unspeakable Crimes of Dr. Petiot by Thomas Maeder

Book Review: The Unspeakable Crimes of Dr. Petiot by Thomas Maeder

About: The Unspeakable Crimes of Dr. Petiot by Thomas Maeder is a non-fiction crime book taking place in France during World War II. My rat­ing for The Unspeakable Crimes of Dr. Petiot — 4 Buy The Unspeakable Crimes of Dr. Petiot from Amazon.com* More Books by Jonathan Rabb Thoughts: The Unspeakable Crimes of Dr. Petiot by Thomas Maeder […]

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