Book Review: The Intimate Lives of the Founding Fathers by Thomas Fleming
Latest Posts , Non-Fiction / February 27, 2013

Post firs published as Guest Review From Man Of La Book: “The Intimate Lives of the Founding Fathers” by Thomas Fleming on http://twofistedreader.com About: The Intimate Lives of the Founding Fathers by Thomas Fleming is a history book which tells about the lives of six famous men from the perspective of their relationship with the women in their lives. I do love books which tells us more history from the “trenches”, after all, there are very few big events which aren’t made of small, personal moments. Buy this book in paper or electronic format.  Thoughts: The Intimate Lives of the Founding Fathers by Thomas Fleming is what one might call “history light”. While there was no new information revealed in the book, it is a wonderful introduction to more serious works which deal with the Founding Fathers, their policies and how the relationships with other influenced their work (which still has ramifications to this day) and their policies. Mr. Fleming does not view the Founding Fathers as untouchable historical figures, but as men of flesh and blood who lived, loved, laughed, hurt and gotten hurt. The author’s research is excellent and his writing style is enjoyable. Those who only learned…

Guest Review: Ghostman by Roger Hobbs
Guest Posts , Latest Posts / February 26, 2013

For an interesting book that can suck you in, “Ghostman” by Roger Hobbs can easily eat any available time you may have. If you like crime stories, this novel involves the classic casino heist with an added twist. The heist doesn’t really go as planned and a man simply known as ‘Jack’ is called upon to help. It’s a fun novel that has everything you could want in a crime story, and Roger Hobbs delivers a well written and hard to put down book. Buy this book in paper or in elec­tronic format* 1. Flashbacks – The book is written using a style of flashback that is easy to follow. These glimpses of the past happen five years prior to the current events of the novel and could stand apart from the book itself. Many times, authors try to engage the reader with character building flashbacks that usually end up confusing them. That confusion is simply not present in “Ghostman.” 2. Unique Characterization – The character of ‘Jack’ is developed very well and is easy to visualize. Being a master of disguises, ‘Jack’ can change his appearance to become virtually anyone he wishes. Roger Hobbs has done a masterful job at detailing these…

Book Review: Prague Winter by Madeleine Albright

Article first published as Book Review: Prague Winter: A Personal Story of Remembrance and War, 1937-1948 by Madeleine Albright on Blogcritics. About: Prague Winter: A Personal Story of Remembrance and War, 1937-1948 by Madeleine Albright is a non-fiction book in which the author talks about the years mentioned from her perspective. Somewhat personal, adventurous and moving, this memoir takes the reader on a European history lesson which is not often told. The pub­lisher is giv­ing away one copy of this book –to enter fill out the Raf­fle­copt­ter form at the end of the post. 480 pages Publisher: Harper Perennial Language: English ISBN-10: 0062030345 My rating for Prague Winter – 5 Buy this book in paper or in elec­tronic (Kindle enhanced with audio) format* More Books by Madeleine Albright More Rec­om­mended World War II books on Man of la BookStore Thoughts: “”There is not deeper cause for despair than malicious hope (Hitler proved that), and few traits more valuable than sadness and anger at suffering. The distinction that matters is not whether a story concludes happily but whether there is at its core an affirmation that life has meaning. That is why this book of remembrance and war will end in hope.” My grandfather was born in Bratislava, a city in Czechoslovakia….

Books That Inspired Oscar Nominated Movies
Latest Posts / February 23, 2013

Two goats are rumbling through the trash at the back of the MGM lot in Hollywood. One of them, eating a reel of film, looks up and says: “This movie is good”. The other one, eating paper, replies: “You should try the book”. The movie industry has always looked for literature for inspirations, non-fiction, novels and comic books have all helped Hollywood make quality features and bring the stories to the masses. This year is no exception, many movies are from well known best sellers. Unforgettably I haven’t gotten to see any, but if you liked the movie, give the book a try. Life of Pi (paper | electronic) Director Ang Lee adapted Yann Martel’s Life of Pi even though the movie was was known as “unfilmable”.  The movie was nominated for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Writing (Adapted Screenplay), Best Cinematography, Best Music (Original Score), and Best Music (Original Song). Les Misérables (paper | electronic) Victor Hugo’s classic is nominated in six categories (among them Best Picture and Best Actress). The book shows Paris in its grittiness during the tryng times of the French Revolution. Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln (paper | electronic) Doris Kearns Goodwin’s book inspired Steven Spielberg to direct Lincoln. Even though the movie is only a small part of the book, it shows Lincoln’s way…

Fun Facts Friday: James Russell Lowell
Fun Facts Friday , Latest Posts / February 22, 2013

On this day in 1819 James Russell Lowell (d: 12 August, 1891) was born in Cambridge, MA.  Mr. Lowell was a poet, critic editor and even a diplomat. Works by James Russell Lowell Lowell attended Harvard at age 15. He was known as a troublemaker and wrote: “During Freshman year, I did nothing, during Sophomore year I did nothing, during Junior year I did nothing, and during Senior year I have thus far done nothing in the way of college studies.“ For his first attempts at poetry, Lowell wrote for the Harvardiana literary magazine (which he also edited). He freely admitted that his poems were bad and said that “I was as great an ass as ever brayed & thought it singing.” Even though he was elected “class poet” (1838) he was not allowed to read a poem on Class Day since he was suspended. Lowell did graduate from Harvard and not knowing what to do he decided to practice law. Lowell married Maria White, a sister of a Harvard classmate, who persuaded him to become an abolitionist. The Lowells had 4 children, however only one lived past infancy.  Lowell grieved over his children and particular his first born, Rose,…

Book Review: The Thief of Auschwitz by Jon Clinch
5 Stars , Fiction , Latest Posts / February 21, 2013

Article first published as Book Review: The Thief of Auschwitz by Jon Clinch on Blogcritics. About: The Thief of Auschwitz by Jon Clinch is a fictional book telling of a family’s struggle to survive. Mr. Clinch’s previous books, Finn and Kings of the Earth won awards and commendation from around the country. The pub­lisher is giv­ing away one copy to two winners of this book –to enter fill out the Raf­fle­copt­ter form at the end of the post.   My rating for The Thief of Auschwitz – 5 Buy this book in paper or in elec­tronic format* More Books by Jon Clinch More Rec­om­mended World War II books on Man of la BookStore Thoughts: The Thief of Auschwitz by Jon Clinch (website | Facebook | @jonclinch) is a fascinating and well written book. Even though short, Mr. Clinch is an excellent storyteller presenting a beautiful story and tight page-turner. The story portrays a Jewish family trying to stay sane in a world gone mad. The family is trying to salvage a bit of civility wherever they can in a place that could on be described as hell on earth. The story doesn’t have many twists, but several convenient plot points which, although a bit too convenient are central to…

Book Review: Bombing Hitler by Hellmut G. Haasis
4 Stars , Latest Posts , Non-Fiction / February 20, 2013

Article first published as Book Review: Bombing Hitler: The Story of the Man Who Almost Assassinated the Führer by Hellmut G. Haasis, Translated by William Odom on Blogcritics About: Bombing Hitler: The Story of the Man Who Almost Assassinated the Führer by Hellmut G. Haasis, (translated by William Odom) is the true story of Georg Elser and his failed attempt on Hitler’s life. 240 pages Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing Language: English ISBN-10: 1616087412 My rat­ing for Bombing Hitler— 4 Buy this book in paper or in elec­tronic format* More Rec­om­mended World War II books on Man of la BookStore Thoughts: Bombing Hitler by Hellmut G. Haasis tells of Georg Elser’s decision to assassinate Hitler in a Munich Beer Hall. Elser’s said that he simply wanted to” prevent even greater bloodshed through my act”. Elser, a blue collar worker, worked and planned for months in order to plant a bomb in a pillar which supports the roof of the beer hall.  The bomb worked, killing eight people, but missing its intended target who had to leave early for Berlin (cutting his speech from 2 hours to a mere hour). The book is a well researched document, using interviews from first hand sources as well as historical documentation, the author…

Book Reivew: The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
4 Stars , Fiction , Latest Posts / February 19, 2013

Arti­cle first pub­lished as The Book Theif by Markus Zusak on Blog­crit­ics About: The Book Thief by Austrian author Markus Zusak is a novel taking place in Nazi Germany. The book was published in 2006, since then it has won many awards and spent over 230 weeks on the New York Times Bestseller list. 576 pages Publisher: Alfred A. Knopf Language: English ISBN-10: 0375842209     My rating for The Book Thief – 4 Buy this book in paper or in elec­tronic format* More Rec­om­mended World War II books on Man of la BookStore Thoughts: She was a girl. In Nazi Germany. How fitting that she was discovering the power of words. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak is a very popular novel, mainly among the YA crowd, and I can certainly see why. The book celebrates the power of the written word, of language, encourages people to read has an interesting twist in the narration. The book approach to the Holocaust, not straight on but looking from the sidelines, will appeal to teens as well as adults. The young heroine, Liesel Meminger who is a feisty girl who navigates through the claustrophobic and schizophrenic world of adults in Nazi Germany is both smart and tough, with…

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