Archive for the ‘Fiction’ Category

Book Review: Live and Let Die by Ian Fleming

Mr. Fleming’s descriptions of Harlem, voodoo and thrilling adventures are as exciting as ever. The tone in this novel is grittier than its predecessor, with more action moving the story forward.
And a fight with a giant octopus.

Book Review: A Possibility of Violence by D. A. Mishani

A Possibility of Violence is not a fast paced book, it is more introspective and analytical as Avraham makes his way toward, what he believes, is the right resolution to his case.

Book Review: Blood of Vipers by Michael Wallace

The reader can feel the exhaustion of bot the American soldiers and German civilians. The fanaticism of the Nazi gangsters is seen through one officer who refuses to admit defeat even though it is obvious to his subscripted, enslaved soldiers that it is indeed the case.

Book Review: The 3rd Woman by Jonathan Freedland

The setting takes place close to a hotly contested election to the governorship of California where both candidates are trying to stay on the good side of the Chinese, knowing full well that American citizens despise having a foreign military presence in their midst.

Book Review: The Madagaskar Plan by Guy Saville

The narrative is fast and bloody, the story is fascinating and complex with many sub plots to keep track of. The characters, both real and fictional, are well written and dimensional.

Book Review: The Memory Painter by Gwendolyn Womack

I enjoyed to read the research the author woven into the book. One of the main character is a neurologist and I found the science fascinating.

Book Review: The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden by Jonas Jonasson

The stories that the author tells are unbelievable at best, however he seems to subscribe to the same theory as Maxwell Scott from The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance “No, sir. This is the West, sir. When the legend becomes fact, print the legend”. The stories which make up the book are both absurd and spot-on and, most amazing of all, somehow work nicely together (warning: the ability to suspend disbelief is a must to read this book).

Book Review: The Festival of Insignificance by Milan Kundera

I laughed here and there, but I found the book to be more thought provoking than funny. I’m glad the philosophical discussions in the book weren’t much longer, even though they were fascinating.

Book Review: New World by Andrew Motion

It is a brave endeavor to write a sequel or a prequel to existing, classic novels and Mr. Motion does justice to Stevenson’s style and story.

Book Review: City of Women by David R. Gillham

Mr. Gillham writes about the misery, despair and paranoia of the German people living under a Nazi regime. A world where evil rules, social justice does not exist, and a wrong word would send you off to a concentration camp, while lacking a safe shelter and food.