Sense and Senselessness or A DRM Love/Hate Story (OK, Hate)
Latest Posts , Opinion / April 12, 2011

Yesterday MediaBistro published an article quoting Richard Nash from Red Lemonade imprint stating that they are taking the unusual step of giving out eBooks for reviewers without Digital Rights Management (DRM) imprinted on them. Mr. Nash said: “Well, I don’t think consumer books should have DRM, so putting DRM on reviewers’ books is even dumber. I want to make it as easy as possible to get it to you, as easy as possible for you to read it, as easy as possible for you to assign it to a reviewer, as easy as possible for you to send it to a friend.” Do you get it, Mr. Nash’s thinking, common sense to you and me, is considered “unusual”. Newsflash if you’ve been in a cave/ivory tower/corporate America for the past 20 years. DRM has never worked. All DRM did is give honest consumers a hard time and waste the company’s money by fighting DRM pirates who are always one step ahead (at least). Not to mention that all you need is one person to crack the DRM and the file will be available to everybody. I can assure you that your DRM will be cracked in about 15 minutes after…

Factual Friday: The Hunchback of Notre Dame
Fun Facts Friday , Latest Posts / April 8, 2011

Even though it took me a while to get into The Hunchback of Notre Dame I was very impressed with the book (book review) and thought the last 200 pages were certainly work trudging through some of it. 1) The original title of the book is “Notre Dame de Paris” which translates into “Our Lady of Paris” – a much more fitting title in my opinion. 2) Victor Hugo made it clear that the main character in the novel is the cathedral and not any of the characters. 3) Victor Hugo was strongly against the English title. 4) Dom Claude Frollo named the abandoned child he found in the chruch “Quasimodo” because he found him on Quasimodo Sunday. 5) “Quasi modo” in Latin translates to “almost standard” but actually means “similar to”. Believe it or not this name is in line with common medieval naming conventions. The Hunchback by Brian Bustard – Purchase a Print 6) Quasimodo has fifteen bells but his favorite is named “Big Marie” 7) In the novel, Esmeralda is 14-16 years old. 8 ) Esmeralda is charged with witchcraft, among other offenses. 9) One of the subplots is Esmeralda’s search for her mother. 10) There are…

Book Review: Killing Rommel by Steven Pressfield
5 Stars , Fiction , Latest Posts / April 4, 2011

The story  is presented through the eyes of Lieutenant R. Lawrence Chapman (Chap) a fictional tank commander who was “loaned” to a famed commando unit called the Long Range Dessert Group (LDRG) to help asses the dessert for passable routes when the big invasion comes.

Chap quickly becomes friends with his the members of his new unit and meets some historical personalities which have since become legendary(Jake Easonsmith, Paddy Mayne, Ron Tinker, Nick Wilder, Vladimir “Popski ” Peniakoff and more). These personalities give historical authenticity to this fictional account of war. One of the group’s missions is to find out where Rommel is and call in an air-strike, hence the title of the book.

Blog Now Available on Kindle
Latest Posts , Uncategorized / April 3, 2011

As of this week, all of you avid readers can get ManOfLaBook.com on your Kindle – simply subscribe here and get a 14 day free trial and then pay $1.99 per month. Why $1.99? I don’t know – Amazon.com decided on that price (I get 30% which will go towards maintaining the blog and my library). Why should you pay for something you can get for free? That’s not up to me to say, is it? If you like my blog I’d appreciate if you’d write a few good words on Amazon.com. Thanks, Zohar – Man of la Book  

Factual Friday: Anna Sewell
Fun Facts Friday , Latest Posts / April 1, 2011

Author Anna Sewel (30 March 1820 – 25 April 1878) was an English novelist best known for her classic novel “Black Beauty”. Below are a few facts about Ms. Sewel just in case you’re ever on Jeopardy. 1. Anna Sewell was part of a devout Quaker family. 2. Anna’s mother, Mary Wright Sewell,  was a popular author of “juvenile bestsellers” including “Mother’s Last Words” which sold millions of copies throughout the world. 3. Anna Sewell never recovered fully from an accident she had. Her love for horses is attributed to her difficulty walking. 4. During the writing of “Black Beauty” Anna became sicker and sicker. The novel was finished only through her mother’s transcription and dictation. 5.While traveling in Europe seeking to improve her health, Sewell met several artists, philosophers and writers. The exposure is believed to have contributed to “Black Beauty”. 6. “Black Beauty was Anna Sewell’s only publication. 7. Although considered a children’s classic, Sewell wrote “Black Beauty” for people who work with horses. 8. “Black Beauty” was suppose to have “a special aim being to induce kindness, sympathy, and an understanding treatment of horses” 9.  Sadly, Sewell died several months after the release of “Black Beauty” and…

Book Review: Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford
4 Stars , Fiction , Latest Posts / March 30, 2011

I bought this book. My rating for Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet – 4 About: “Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet” by Jamie Ford (Website | Twitter) is a fictional book set during a volatile time in American history. Jamie Ford has created intriguing characters telling an extraordinary story. 301 pages Publisher: Ballantine Books ISBN: 0345505344 Pur­chase “Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet” through the ManOfLa­Book affil­i­ate account on: Ama­zon |Book Depos­i­tory US | Book Depos­i­tory UK Thoughts: “Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet” by Jamie Ford is a very good book, easy to read, written in cinematic detail and vividness. The characters of Henry and Keiko are memorable and very likable. The book touches on a part of American history which is rarely talked about, the internment camps built for Japanese Americans (not Italians or Germans mind you) during World War II. Those who were put in the camps lost all their possessions, wealth, businesses, social standing etc. The story is multi-dimensional, and explores the relationship between a first and second generation Chinese Americans (Henry and his father), second and third generations (Henry and his son) and of course the love…

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