Book Spotlight: How Fires End by Marco Rafalà

A dark secret born out of World War II lies at the heart of a Sicilian American family in this emotional and sweeping saga of guilt, revenge, and, ultimately, redemption. After soldiers vacate the Sicilian hillside town of Melilli in the summer of 1943, the locals celebrate, giving thanks to their patron saint, Sebastian. Amid […]

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Fun Facts Friday: Heinrich von Kleist

Heinrich von Kleist (18, October 1777 – 21, November 1811) was a poet, novelist, writer and journalist from Germany.

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Book Review: The First Stone by Carsten Jensen

A platoon of Danish soldiers, part of NATO forces, are hampered down in Afghanistan fighting the Taliban. Third platoon has a charismatic and brave leader, Schrøder, who answers to Colonel Steffensen. The two man are polar opposites.

The soldiers embark on a revenge mission, without realizing they are being set up by a traitor from within. Third platoon realizes that in war you have to make inconvenient allies, and embrace strange bedfellows just to survive the day.
If you’re lucky.

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Book Review: The Second World War Illustrated by Jack Holroyd

The book is full of pictures, many of which I have never seen, each one with an engrossing caption.

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Book Review: The Binding by Bridget Collins

I was looking forward to reading more about the “binding”, how it worked, affected people and what is Emmett’s role in the whole magical realm the author created.

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Fun Facts Friday: Elmore Leonard

Elmore Leonard (11 October, 1925 – 20 August, 2013) was an American writer and screenwriter who specialized in thrillers and crime fiction.

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Book Review: The Names Heard Long Ago by Jonathan Wilson

The Names Heard Long Ago: How the Golden Age of Hungarian Soccer Shaped the Modern Game by Jonathan Wilson recounts how the Hungary’s changed soccer and became a powerhouse exporting players and coaches to the world.

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Book Review: The First Wave by Alex Kershaw

I enjoyed this book very much, it is very easy to read and Mr. Kershaw, as usual, goes out of his way to tell big stories in an intimate way. Even though I read numerous books bout D-Day, the individual accounts in this book were refreshing and help me get a better understanding of the success of these groups.

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Book Review: Somewhere in the Mediterranean by Mark Tiro

Book Review: Somewhere in the Mediterranean by Mark Tiro

Israel sometime during the 1990s, a beach is cleared for an army exercise, but one man accidentally stays there. The man witnesses a strange occurrence, a World War II refugee ship arrives.

Fun Facts Friday: Robert Pirsig

Fun Facts Friday: Robert Pirsig

Robert Pirsig (6 September, 1928) is mainly known for his book Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values in which he tells of his of motorcycle trip he and his young son Chris from Minneapolis to San Francisco. The book explores western culture and analyzes forms of philosophy. Books by Robert […]

Book Review: The Cleaner by Mark Dawson

Book Review: The Cleaner by Mark Dawson

While predictable and somewhat fragmented, this has all the makings of a good series.

Book Review: Bursts of Fire by Susan Forest

Book Review: Bursts of Fire by Susan Forest

Even though the main characters didn’t work for me, I did enjoy much of the novel regardless of a few glaring plot holes and pacing.

Fun Facts Friday: Mary Shelley

Fun Facts Friday: Mary Shelley

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (30 August, 1787 – 1 February, 1851) was an English author who is most widely known for her novel, Frankenstein. Image from http://frankensteinproject.wordpress.com/ More Books by Mary Shelley Mary’s mother died only 10 days after giving her birth. Mary didn’t have a formal education, however she made great use of her father’s […]

Book Review: Alexander the Great: His Life and His Mysterious Death by Anthony Everitt

Book Review: Alexander the Great: His Life and His Mysterious Death by Anthony Everitt

In his book, Alexander the Great: His Life and His Mysterious Death author Anthony Everitt paints of picture of his subject with all his strengths and weaknesses, showing a flawed human and not a godlike figure – as Alexander himself would have liked us to see

Graphic Novel Review: Wonder Woman, Volume 4: Godwatch by Greg Rucka

Graphic Novel Review: Wonder Woman, Volume 4: Godwatch by Greg Rucka

The artwork is gorgeous, very impressive and dynamic. The artists go back to the classic look of Diana Prince / Wonder Woman which, for me, is a big plus. Not that I dislike the bubbly DC artwork, but it just wouldn’t work here.

Fun Facts Friday: Edgar Lee Masters

Fun Facts Friday: Edgar Lee Masters

A series of poems about Mr. Masters’ childhood in Western Illinois appeared in a St. Louis literary journal called Reedy’s Mirror. Contributors to the journal included Ezra Pound, Robert Frost, and Theodore Dreiser.

Book Review: The Liberation of Paris by Jean Edward Smith

Book Review: The Liberation of Paris by Jean Edward Smith

Von Choltitz loved Paris, but not so much the regime’s leadership, promptly ignored the order to destory the city – most likely knowing that it could cost him his life.

Book Review: Great Battles for Boys: Ancients to Middle Ages (Great Battles for Boys #1) by Joe Giorello

Book Review: Great Battles for Boys: Ancients to Middle Ages (Great Battles for Boys #1) by Joe Giorello

This book was an easy read, the chapters are concise and highlight the interesting parts of each battle without bogging down with too many details. I think the book is a great introduction to history and all the fascinating stories it provides.

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