Book Review: Anxious People by Fredrik Backman

In a small Swedish town, a bank robbery has taken place. The bank robber is, obviously, not a professional for trying to rob a cashless bank. The robber stumbles into a showing for an apartment, on New Year’s Eve no less, and accidentally turns the incident into a hostage situation.

Read More

Fun Facts Friday: Dr. Samuel Johnson

Dr. Samuel Johnson (18 September, 1709 – 12 December, 1784) was an English write, poet and essayist who has made large contributions to English literature.

Read More

Book Review: A Lion in the Grass by Mark Zvonkovic

This was a surprising book, unlike many of the espionage novels I’ve read before. The story takes place over 70+ years in which the protagonist finds himself on the edge of history, like many of us do.

Read More

Book Review: A Quiet Madness: A biographical novel of Edgar Allan Poe by John Isaac Jones

I don’t know much about Poe’s life, besides the bullet points many people are familiar with. I thought the author did a good job re imagining his life, habits, and most of all motivations. I especially enjoyed the chapter in which Poe wrote his most famous poem “The Raven” and how it came to be.

Read More

Fun Facts Friday: O. Henry

O. Henry (11 September, 1862 – 5 June, 1910) was an American writer, known for his short stories.

Read More

Book Review: Comrade Koba by Robert Littell

It is unclear what role Koba plays in Stalin’s government, except that he is a very high, and admired advisor. Koba, like Stalin, also came from Georgia and, like Stalin, excuses the crimes which the regime commits as a path to a greater “worker’s paradise”. It is a very interesting exercise to explain such concepts to an audience, especially if they’re ten year olds. Koba, at points, seem to be trying to convince himself of the deeds he is a part of, instead of convincing Leon

Read More

Book Review: Stan Lee: A Life in Comics by Liel Leibovitz

This is a short biography on one of the most influential men in American pop-culture, and a true American success story. The book tries to tie Stan Lee’s stories and ideas to Jewish culture and Jewish religious book, some of the passages are a stretch, but all of them are interesting and show an understanding of the author of the characters he created.

Read More

Fun Facts Friday: François-Auguste-René, vicomte de Chateaubriand

François-Auguste-René, vicomte de Chateaubriand (4 September, 1768 – 4 July, 1848) was a French author and diplomat, known as one of the first Romantic writes of his country.

Read More

Book Review: Heart of Junk by Luke Geddes

Book Review: Heart of Junk by Luke Geddes

This was a fun, original novel. It’s not meant to be taken seriously and the author embraces each character’s person, quirks, and stereotype.

Book Review: A Single Swallow by Ling Zhang

Book Review: A Single Swallow by Ling Zhang

The first chapter or two got me interested in the concept, ghosts meeting up in a per-scheduled date and time, even though they had to wait a few decades for the meeting to cumulate fully. The narrative got slower than, but the rich language kept me going and once Ah Yan got introduced the whole story took off.

Fun Facts Friday: Cyrano de Bergerac

Fun Facts Friday: Cyrano de Bergerac

When he was 19 years old, de Bergerac enlisted a corps of the guards from 1639 to 1640. Since he was an officer and a nobleman, even a though a minor one, he was known for boasting and dueling.

Book Spotlight: The Hidden Key by David E. Grogan

Book Spotlight: The Hidden Key by David E. Grogan

When Navy veteran Kevin Jones answers the door for two men he doesn’t know, he can’t foresee the Pandora’s Box he’s opening. One week later, attorney Steve Stilwell meets with a billionaire businessman in a London eatery. As two men burst into the restaurant, Steve’s new client cries out “I’ve sold my soul.” Moments later he is dead, leaving Steve to figure out why.

Book Review: 100 Drives, 5,000 Ideas (2020 Edition) by Joe Yogerst

Book Review: 100 Drives, 5,000 Ideas (2020 Edition) by Joe Yogerst

100 Drives, 5,000 Ideas: Where to Go, When to Go, What to Do, What to See by Joe Yogerst gives the reader excellent ideas of where to go and what to do within their geographical area (for our family, we figure about 100 miles one way, for a day trip). The book also has great tips for those who like to do more than to drive, but bike, camp, hike, etc.

Guest Post: Edgar Allan Poe: The Fall of the House of Usher Examined by Ren Zelen

Guest Post: Edgar Allan Poe: The Fall of the House of Usher Examined by Ren Zelen

Central to this story is that fact that Roderick and the Lady Madeline are twins, this suggests that when he buries her, he hopes that death will somehow separate them. However, this act of division between the living and the dead merely culminates in the Fall of the House of Usher. When Roderick tries to rid himself of his twin half, he is, in effect, signing his own death warrant. 

Fun Facts Friday: John Tenniel

Fun Facts Friday: John Tenniel

Tenniel was honored as a living national treasure and for his public service was knighted in 1893 by Queen Victoria, the first cartoonist or illustrator to receive the honor.

Book Review: Wolf by Herbert J. Stern and Alan A. Winter

Book Review: Wolf by Herbert J. Stern and Alan A. Winter

Through Friedrich we are witnessing one of the ugliest events of the 20th century, from the front seat. Friedrich is privy to many meetings and has a personal insight into Hitler’s taking over Germany

Book Review: Eat Sleep Work Repeat by Bruce Daisley

Book Review: Eat Sleep Work Repeat by Bruce Daisley

In Eat Sleep Work Repeat: 30 Hacks for Bringing Joy to Your Job by Bruce Daisley the author does not only concentrate on cultural changes which, let’s face it, most of us are not in a position to implement, but also on little changes you can make to make your work life more manageable.

Book Review: All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

Book Review: All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque does not glamorize war, it is not a battle zone fantasy a-la 80s Hollywood action flicks. It is a sad and sober reflection on the toll war takes on individual soldiers, their families, society, and country. In fact, the Nazis hated this book so much, and the movie, that they banned it altogether.

Page 10 of 230« First...89101112203040...Last »
Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial
RSS
Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial
RSS