Archive for the ‘Fiction’ Category

Book Review: The Swimmer by Joakim Zander

Klara Walldéen is an aide to the European Union Parliament who is working in Brussels. Klara grew up with her grandparents on a remote archipelago in Sweden. Accidentally Klara has gotten possession of a laptop containing information that the European Union as well as the US government does not want to be publicized.

Book Review: Forgiving Maximo Rothman by A. J. Sidransky

This is one of those rare books which are intelligent, informative and entreating. Mr. Sidransky is an excellent author and I’m looking forward to reading more of his work.

Book Review: Asylum City by Liad Shoham

The author casts a wide net across Israeli society when it comes to solving the murder Anat is working on. Anat is a strong protagonist who loves her job and has to deal with rampant sexism of her co-workers and her superiors who have half her intelligence.

Graphic Novel Review: Batman: The Killing Joke by Alan Moore

The tale of the man who one day would become The Joker is excellent. I don’t know if Mr. Moore intended to contribute this much to the DC mythology (the largest contribution is that of Barbara Gordon’s tale) but in this story he did.

Book Review: The Girl with a Clock for a Heart by Peter Swanson

I enjoyed reading this book, the way the story unfolds is interesting and how the protagonist works through it from the past, to present-day, back to the past is skillfully written. I liked how the author managed to makes the reader think the answer to the question is just on the next page, and then he just pulls it from us to be out of reach again.

Book Review: John the Pupil by David Flusfeder

The story is both funny and clever. Right from the first pages, the author mocks the entire book by stating that “all historical novels are failures”, that takes guts.

Book Review: The Lost Solos by Eshkol Nevo

The author managed to captures several aspects of Israeli society, the Russian immigrant, a soldier, politician, religious Jew, an Arab bird-lover and more. The point of view constantly changes in the story which gives the narrative it’s on dynamic and takes on a life of its own.

Book Review: The Heart Does Not Grow Back by Fred Venturini

This novel was fun and a fast read, plus it gave me much to think about. This is a smart book, but it is not for everyone, and I’m glad the author didn’t water it down or try to write for the lowest common denominator, instead writing an excellent story.

Book Review: Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman

Mr. Gaiman is a master of the modern fairytale, a genre he helped create, abstractly manipulating physics and using legends as histories (“It all depends on how you look at it”, he says). The real power of the novel lies in the author’s writing and voice, he can describe scenes, people and events without much detail or verbiage, but the reader can draw a picture of the scene and get a feeling for the mood.

Book Review: The Book of Zev by Marilyn Horowitz

Zev Bronfman, an angry atheist who was brought up in a Hassidic home escapes death from a falling beam. This near death experience was a wakeup call for Zev, who leaves his parents for a not-so-lucrative job as a cab driver in New York City.

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