Book Review: The Insurgents by Fred Kaplan

The Insur­gents: David Petraeus and the Plot to Change the Amer­i­can Way of War by Fred Kaplan is a thought pro­vok­ing book which tells a good story and asks some hard hit­ting ques­tions. The book is divided into three parts: the post-Vietnam era and intro­duc­tion of coun­terin­sur­gency (COIN) war­fare line of think­ing into the US mil­i­tary, the his­tory of COIN in Afghanistan and Iraq (with input from Wash­ing­ton politi­cians), and a third part which ana­lyzes what was accom­plished and the value of this strategy.

Read More

Bookish Beer: Samuel Smith's Winter Welcome Ale

In my quest for unique and won­der­ful beers, I always keep an eye out for book themed brews when I hap­pened upon this trea­sure. Samuel Smith's Win­ter Wel­come Ale, an imported beer from Eng­land, rich in fla­vor and ambered color.

Read More

Fun Facts Friday: Gustave Flaubert

When Madame Bovary was seri­al­ized in a news­pa­per, the French gov­ern­ment sued the author and pub­lisher on charges of immoral­ity. The gov­ern­ment lost.

Read More

Giveaway: 108 Rock Star Guitars by Lisa S. Johnson

Yes­ter­day I posted about 108 Rock Star Gui­tars by Lisa S. John­son, a won­der­ful book for any music lover to have on their cof­fee table.  Luck­ily the pub­lisher has agreed to a give­away of this book to one lucky win­ner — enter using the Raf­fle­copter form below. Give­away Give­away ends: Decem­ber 17, 2014 US Ship­ping Addresses […]

Read More

Book Review: 108 Rock Star Guitars by Lisa S. Johnson

108 Rock Star Gui­tars by Lisa S. John­son is a book fea­tur­ing pho­tographs of gui­tars (and gui­tars only) of famous gui­tarists. The book took 17 years for Ms. John­son to com­pile and photograph.

Read More

Book Review: My Pearl Harbor Scrapbook 1941 by Bess Taubman and Ernest Arroyo

My Pearl Har­bor Scrap­book 1941 by authors Bess Taub­man & Ernest Arroyo and illus­trated by Edward L. Cox Jr. is a non-fiction book which has the look and feel of a post WWII scrap­book and tells the story of the attack on Pearl Har­bor and its aftermath.

Read More

Guest Post: America's First Air Hero's of WWII or "Just An Easy Day"

On the eve of Decem­ber 6th, Lieu­tenants Ken­neth M. Tay­lor and George S. Welch, dressed in tuxe­dos, attended a for­mal dance at the Officer's Club at Hickam Field. They left around 11 p.m. and drove back to the Bachelor's Offi­cer Quar­ters at Wheeler Field. The usual Sat­ur­day night poker game at the BOQ was in full swing so they sat in to play. Welch turned in early. Close to 4 a.m. a weary Tay­lor left the game to hit the sack think­ing Sun­day would just be another easy day.

Read More

Book Review: Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman

Mr. Gaiman is a mas­ter of the mod­ern fairy­tale, a genre he helped cre­ate, abstractly manip­u­lat­ing physics and using leg­ends as his­to­ries ("It all depends on how you look at it”, he says). The real power of the novel lies in the author’s writ­ing and voice, he can describe scenes, peo­ple and events with­out much detail or ver­biage, but the reader can draw a pic­ture of the scene and get a feel­ing for the mood.

Read More

Book Review: The Insurgents by Fred Kaplan

Book Review: The Insurgents by Fred Kaplan

The Insur­gents: David Petraeus and the Plot to Change the Amer­i­can Way of War by Fred Kaplan is a thought pro­vok­ing book which tells a good story and asks some hard hit­ting ques­tions. The book is divided into three parts: the post-Vietnam era and intro­duc­tion of coun­terin­sur­gency (COIN) war­fare line of think­ing into the US mil­i­tary, the his­tory of COIN in Afghanistan and Iraq (with input from Wash­ing­ton politi­cians), and a third part which ana­lyzes what was accom­plished and the value of this strategy.

Bookish Beer: Samuel Smith's Winter Welcome Ale

Bookish Beer: Samuel Smith's Winter Welcome Ale

In my quest for unique and won­der­ful beers, I always keep an eye out for book themed brews when I hap­pened upon this trea­sure. Samuel Smith's Win­ter Wel­come Ale, an imported beer from Eng­land, rich in fla­vor and ambered color.

Fun Facts Friday: Gustave Flaubert

Fun Facts Friday: Gustave Flaubert

When Madame Bovary was seri­al­ized in a news­pa­per, the French gov­ern­ment sued the author and pub­lisher on charges of immoral­ity. The gov­ern­ment lost.

Giveaway: 108 Rock Star Guitars by Lisa S. Johnson

Giveaway: 108 Rock Star Guitars by Lisa S. Johnson

Yes­ter­day I posted about 108 Rock Star Gui­tars by Lisa S. John­son, a won­der­ful book for any music lover to have on their cof­fee table.  Luck­ily the pub­lisher has agreed to a give­away of this book to one lucky win­ner — enter using the Raf­fle­copter form below. Give­away Give­away ends: Decem­ber 17, 2014 US Ship­ping Addresses […]

Book Review: 108 Rock Star Guitars by Lisa S. Johnson

Book Review: 108 Rock Star Guitars by Lisa S. Johnson

108 Rock Star Gui­tars by Lisa S. John­son is a book fea­tur­ing pho­tographs of gui­tars (and gui­tars only) of famous gui­tarists. The book took 17 years for Ms. John­son to com­pile and photograph.

Book Review: My Pearl Harbor Scrapbook 1941 by Bess Taubman and Ernest Arroyo

Book Review: My Pearl Harbor Scrapbook 1941 by Bess Taubman and Ernest Arroyo

My Pearl Har­bor Scrap­book 1941 by authors Bess Taub­man & Ernest Arroyo and illus­trated by Edward L. Cox Jr. is a non-fiction book which has the look and feel of a post WWII scrap­book and tells the story of the attack on Pearl Har­bor and its aftermath.

Guest Post: America's First Air Hero's of WWII or "Just An Easy Day"

Guest Post: America's First Air Hero's of <span class=WWII or "Just An Easy Day""/>

On the eve of Decem­ber 6th, Lieu­tenants Ken­neth M. Tay­lor and George S. Welch, dressed in tuxe­dos, attended a for­mal dance at the Officer's Club at Hickam Field. They left around 11 p.m. and drove back to the Bachelor's Offi­cer Quar­ters at Wheeler Field. The usual Sat­ur­day night poker game at the BOQ was in full swing so they sat in to play. Welch turned in early. Close to 4 a.m. a weary Tay­lor left the game to hit the sack think­ing Sun­day would just be another easy day.

Book Review: Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman

Book Review: Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman

Mr. Gaiman is a mas­ter of the mod­ern fairy­tale, a genre he helped cre­ate, abstractly manip­u­lat­ing physics and using leg­ends as his­to­ries ("It all depends on how you look at it”, he says). The real power of the novel lies in the author’s writ­ing and voice, he can describe scenes, peo­ple and events with­out much detail or ver­biage, but the reader can draw a pic­ture of the scene and get a feel­ing for the mood.

Guest Post: David Fennelly

Guest Post: David Fennelly

Ink­shares is the new fron­tier in pub­lish­ing, com­bin­ing the best of both worlds, hard copy and elec­tronic. Ink­shares is very 'now'. More­over, a legacy pub­lisher takes 90% of the rev­enue, with just 10% going to the author. With Ink­shares the split is 70–30, in the author's favour. A much bet­ter deal for the writer.

Book Review: The Book of Zev by Marilyn Horowitz

Book Review: The Book of Zev by Marilyn Horowitz

Zev Bronf­man, an angry athe­ist who was brought up in a Has­sidic home escapes death from a falling beam. This near death expe­ri­ence was a wakeup call for Zev, who leaves his par­ents for a not-so-lucrative job as a cab dri­ver in New York City.

Page 1 of 12912345102030...Last »