Book Review: The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden by Jonas Jonasson

The sto­ries that the author tells are unbe­liev­able at best, how­ever he seems to sub­scribe to the same the­ory as Maxwell Scott from The Man Who Shot Lib­erty Valance “No, sir. This is the West, sir. When the leg­end becomes fact, print the leg­end”. The sto­ries which make up the book are both absurd and spot-on and, most amaz­ing of all, some­how work nicely together (warn­ing: the abil­ity to sus­pend dis­be­lief is a must to read this book).

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Twitter Roundup for Week Ending 27 June, 2015

Some of my favorite tweets from the past week

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Fun Facts Friday: Pearl S. Buck

8) Mrs. Buck’s auto­bi­og­ra­phy, My Sev­eral Worlds, does not men­tion her hus­band or par­ents. The book is a detailed account, how­ever, of the life of a par­ent of a dis­abled child.

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Book Review: Operation Garbo by juan Pujol and Nigel West

About: Oper­a­tion Garbo: The Per­sonal Story of the Most Suc­cess­ful Spy of World War II by Juan Pujol and Nigel West is a non-fiction book about the most suc­cess­ful dou­ble agent in World War II. The book is a biog­ra­phy of the life of Juan Pujol, the most accom­plished British dou­ble agent in World War […]

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Book Review: The Festival of Insignificance by Milan Kundera

I laughed here and there, but I found the book to be more thought pro­vok­ing than funny. I’m glad the philo­soph­i­cal dis­cus­sions in the book weren’t much longer, even though they were fascinating.

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Famous Literary Fathers

Happy Father's Day to all. While moms get much lit­er­ary and live love, and rightly so, father's are no slouches either. The media gave fathers a rep­u­ta­tion for being bum­bling, grown up kids, but we all know that's not true, even though some of us have lov­ingly embraced the stereo­type. This Father's Day I thought I'd […]

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Fun Facts Friday: Salman Rushdie

When The Satanic Verses came out sev­eral book stores in Eng­land and the US had bomb scares, two Islamic cler­ics were mur­dered for pub­licly ques­tion­ing the fatwa and book burn­ings were held through­out the world.
Even the most astute PR firm could come up with such bril­liant marketing.

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Book Review: New World by Andrew Motion

It is a brave endeavor to write a sequel or a pre­quel to exist­ing, clas­sic nov­els and Mr. Motion does jus­tice to Stevenson’s style and story.

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Book Review: The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden by Jonas Jonasson

Book Review: The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden by Jonas Jonasson

The sto­ries that the author tells are unbe­liev­able at best, how­ever he seems to sub­scribe to the same the­ory as Maxwell Scott from The Man Who Shot Lib­erty Valance “No, sir. This is the West, sir. When the leg­end becomes fact, print the leg­end”. The sto­ries which make up the book are both absurd and spot-on and, most amaz­ing of all, some­how work nicely together (warn­ing: the abil­ity to sus­pend dis­be­lief is a must to read this book).

Twitter Roundup for Week Ending 27 June, 2015

Twitter Roundup for Week Ending 27 June, 2015

Some of my favorite tweets from the past week

Fun Facts Friday: Pearl S. Buck

Fun Facts Friday: Pearl S. Buck

8) Mrs. Buck’s auto­bi­og­ra­phy, My Sev­eral Worlds, does not men­tion her hus­band or par­ents. The book is a detailed account, how­ever, of the life of a par­ent of a dis­abled child.

Book Review: Operation Garbo by juan Pujol and Nigel West

Book Review: Operation Garbo by juan Pujol and Nigel West

About: Oper­a­tion Garbo: The Per­sonal Story of the Most Suc­cess­ful Spy of World War II by Juan Pujol and Nigel West is a non-fiction book about the most suc­cess­ful dou­ble agent in World War II. The book is a biog­ra­phy of the life of Juan Pujol, the most accom­plished British dou­ble agent in World War […]

Book Review: The Festival of Insignificance by Milan Kundera

Book Review: The Festival of Insignificance by Milan Kundera

I laughed here and there, but I found the book to be more thought pro­vok­ing than funny. I’m glad the philo­soph­i­cal dis­cus­sions in the book weren’t much longer, even though they were fascinating.

Famous Literary Fathers

Famous Literary Fathers

Happy Father's Day to all. While moms get much lit­er­ary and live love, and rightly so, father's are no slouches either. The media gave fathers a rep­u­ta­tion for being bum­bling, grown up kids, but we all know that's not true, even though some of us have lov­ingly embraced the stereo­type. This Father's Day I thought I'd […]

Fun Facts Friday: Salman Rushdie

Fun Facts Friday: Salman Rushdie

When The Satanic Verses came out sev­eral book stores in Eng­land and the US had bomb scares, two Islamic cler­ics were mur­dered for pub­licly ques­tion­ing the fatwa and book burn­ings were held through­out the world.
Even the most astute PR firm could come up with such bril­liant marketing.

Book Review: New World by Andrew Motion

Book Review: New World by Andrew Motion

It is a brave endeavor to write a sequel or a pre­quel to exist­ing, clas­sic nov­els and Mr. Motion does jus­tice to Stevenson’s style and story.

Giveaway: The Wrong Man by Kate White

Giveaway: The Wrong Man by Kate White

Adrenaline-charged and filled with har­row­ing twists at every turn, The Wrong Man will keep read­ers riv­eted until the final page.

Book Review: The Black Count by Tom Reiss

Book Review: The Black Count by Tom Reiss

It is clear that the author devel­oped a great admi­ra­tion towards Gen­eral Dumas, a bas­tard son of a noble­man, born to a slave on the island of Saint-Domingue and ris­ing to be a hero of the French Repub­lic, albeit forgotten.

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