Davíð Stefánsson (21 January, 1895 – 1 March, 1964), born in Fagriskógur, Eyjafjördur, was a well-known poet and novelist from Iceland....

No Comments Man of la Book Read More

I enjoyed this memoir way more than I thought I would. It is entertaining, funny, introspective, extremely personal, open, as well as one hell of a ride...

No Comments Man of la Book Read More

While The Unfamiliar Garden by Benjamin Percy could certainly classify as a horror novel, I found it to be less scary and more of a science-fiction thriller. ...

No Comments Man of la Book Read More

Hugh Lofting was an English poet and author who is known for writing children literature, and specifically his character Dr. Dolittle....

No Comments Man of la Book Read More

You’re professionally accomplished, Yet there’s a part of you that is unsatisfied with achievement alone: You seek a deeper sense of purpose and fulfillment....

No Comments Man of la Book Read More

The descriptions in The Spanish Daughter by Lorena Hughes of the local foods, customs, society, and certainly the cocoa industry were excellent....

No Comments Man of la Book Read More

Robert J. Lloyd discovered Robert Hooke's Diary working on his MA in the History of Ideas. Based on his research, he wrote The Bloodless Boy, a murder mystery...

1 Comment Man of la Book Read More

Sara Gillepsie is her family’s sole survivor after a Nazi bombing. Leaving her home in Ireland, she goes to work in England helping the war effort....

No Comments Man of la Book Read More

Zora Neale Hurston was an author, anthropologist, and filmmaker. She is known for portraying the racial struggles in the early 1900s American South....

No Comments Man of la Book Read More

Author Juhea Kim made a strong debut with her novel Beasts of a Little Land. The book is an epic story of love, friendship, war, and redemption. ...

No Comments Man of la Book Read More
Book Review: The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet by David Mitchell
4 Stars , Non-Fiction / August 9, 2010

The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet is an epic which is meant to be read slowly and deliberately, the tale is smart and the story is fun.  Even though the book incorporates shoguns and samurais, most of the account is carried by clerks and translators.  The epic rescue attempt in a sanctuary surrounded by snow capped mountains is no less exciting than the description of diplomatic rituals and the “arse-licking pilgrimage” one mu...

Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial
RSS
Pinterest
Pinterest
fb-share-icon