Posts Tagged ‘World War I’

Fun Facts Friday: J. R. R. Tolkien

Today he might be known for his work in fiction, but that was his side job. Even today Mr. Tolkien is considered to be one of the most renowned medieval scholars of all time, his publications are still considered a must in libraries.

Fun Facts Friday: Louis Bromfield

The Green Bay Tree, his first novel, was an instant hit. In 1927 Mr. Bromfield won the Pulitzer Prize for his novel Early Autumn. In fact, all of his books, thirty in all, were best sellers and several were made into movies.

Fun Facts Friday: C.S. Lewis

Donating all the proceeds from his books to Christian charities, left Mr. Lewis struggling to pay the large tax bills.

Book Review: The Hawkman: A Fairy Tale of the Great War by Jane Rosenberg LaForge

The prose flows, the story is mystical and powerful at the same time

Book Review: The Silver Music Box by Mina Baites

Ms. Baites created an interesting narrative, combining it with informative information and fascinating characters

Book Review: The Yanks Are Starving by Glen Craney

The Yanks Are Starving: A Novel of the Bonus Army by Glen Craney is a historical fiction book telling the long forgotten story of the Bonus Army of World War 1 vets and how they were treated.

Book Review: African American Army Officers of World War I by Adam P. Wilson

There is a lot of information in this small book, it is very insightful and sometimes dramatic. The author goes back and forth between policies, institutionalize racism and individualized stories to create a coherent timeline.

Book Review: Blue on Blue: A History of Friendly Fire by Geoffrey Regan

This book should be read by anyone who is interested in military history or is aspiring to leading troops.

Book Review: God & Churchill by Jonathan Sandys and Wallace Henley

Mr. Churchill had to have had great resolve and confidence during the time he led the English people. The book attempts to explain his inner strength which helped him during some of the darkest days the world has ever known.

Book Review: The Gendarme by Mark T. Mustian

It is refreshing to read a story from the aggressor’s point of view, usually we get a sore look from the victim’s eyes. This aggressor, however, is justifying his acts, however horrendous. In war and under pressure, as well as mob mentality, regular people commit atrocities which weeks or even days before were unthinkable to them.

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