Posts Tagged ‘Russia’

Book Review: Comrade Koba by Robert Littell

It is unclear what role Koba plays in Stalin’s government, except that he is a very high, and admired advisor. Koba, like Stalin, also came from Georgia and, like Stalin, excuses the crimes which the regime commits as a path to a greater “worker’s paradise”. It is a very interesting exercise to explain such concepts to an audience, especially if they’re ten year olds. Koba, at points, seem to be trying to convince himself of the deeds he is a part of, instead of convincing Leon

Book Review: We Germans by Alexander Starritt

The grandfather, Meissner, and his exhausted companions are living a nightmare for two and a half years. Somehow barely surviving, committing war crimes and treason as they make their way back home in order to live another day

Book Review: How to Lose the Information War by Nina Jankowicz

I have to give Ms. Jankowicz credit for not taking sides and attempting to be as bipartisan as possible. She writes about how many entities on the political spectrum in the US embrace Russian disinformation tactics to their advantage.

Fun Facts Friday: Mikhail Bulgakov

Mikhail Bulgakov (15 May, 1891 – 10 March, 1940) was a Russian writer best known for his novel The Master and Margarita, which was published posthumously.

Book Review: The Leonardo Gulag by Kevin Doherty

The author captured the feeling of being a foreigner in a place which you intimately know very well. It is a feeling many of us get after visiting our childhood home town, after many years of absence.

Book Review: Information Wars by Richard Stengel

Mr. Stengel makes an excellent case about the first part of his subtitle, but sadly the second part “what can we do about it” is not convincing. Mostly because of the government bureaucracies, slow moving administrative machinery, and simply the way democracies work.

Book Review: Last Witnesses by Svetlana Alexievich

The stories the author collected shattered many lives, not the least the childhood of the person telling. Several of them never recovered after their childhood ended abruptly, no matter what age they were.

Fun Facts Friday: Bel Kaufman

Bel Kaufman (10 May, 1911 – 25 July, 2014) was an American author and educator known for her novel Up the Down Staircase (1964). More Books by Bel Kaufman* Ms. Kaufman, born as Bella, in Berlin, Germany to Russian immigrants. The family returned to Russia where her father became a physician and her mother wrote […]

Book Review: Solovyov and Larionov by Eugene Vodolazkin

About: Solovyov and Larionov by Eugene Vodolazkin (translated by Lisa C. Hayden) is a novel, translated from Russian, which is part military history, part academic satire.  This is the author’s first book, but his third translated into English. 368 pages Publisher: Oneworld Publications Language: English ISBN-10: 1786070359   My rating for Solovyov and Larionov – […]

Book Review: Zuleikha by Guzel Yakhina

About: Zuleikha by Guzel  Yakhina (translated by Lisa Hayden) is a novel about a Tartar widow who has been exiled to Siberia in the 1930s.  This book was the winner of the Yasnaya Polyana Literary Award and the Russia Big Book literary prize, as well as being short listed for the Russian Booker Prize. 448 […]

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