Posts Tagged ‘Italy’

Book Review: Profane Fire at the Altar of the Lord by Dennis W. Maley

The story telling is done tongue in cheek, the readers are privy to the lies, manipulations, and political maneuvering getting an overall picture of what is happening

Giveaway & Book Review: More Than a Soldier: One Army Ranger’s Daring Escape From the Nazis​ by D.M. Annechino

The story takes place during World War II, but the war is just a backdrop to this admirable, and well written, story.

Fun Facts Friday: Primo Levi

Levi’s book The Periodic Table (published in 1975), which links qualities of the elements, was named the best science book ever written by the Royal Institution of Great Britain.

Fun Facts Friday: Maxim Gorky

In 1906 Gorky went on a fund raising trip, on behalf of the Bolsheviks, to the United States. During the trip he wrote his novel The Mother when visiting the Adirondack Mountains. Gorky also created a scandal because he was traveling with actress Maria Andreyeva, his lover, instead of his wife. Despite feeling contempt for the bourgeois soul, Gorky came to admire the American spirit.

Book Review: All He Saw Was The Girl by Peter Leonard

The characters in the story are realistic and well written. The personalities involved are entertaining and the storyline is intriguing. There are several main characters but the author does a fine job flowing from one to the other.

Book Review: John the Pupil by David Flusfeder

The story is both funny and clever. Right from the first pages, the author mocks the entire book by stating that “all historical novels are failures”, that takes guts.

Book Review: Napoleon by Andrew Roberts

The author’s astute understanding of the material has provided the book with a fresh take on a man that so much has been written about. Mr. Robert’s understanding of the times and personalities helped him convey that information in a clear, concise manner which kept this book relatively short (considering Napoleon’s notoriety and achievements).

Book Review: Botticelli’s Bastard by Stephen Maitland-Lewis

e protagonist of the book, an art dealer named Giovanni Fabrizzi, finds an old painting of an Italian Count that starts talking to him. The picture tells Giovanni that it was painted by famed artist Sandro Botticelli and its history from the 15th Century to the 20th Century when it was stolen from a Jewish family by the Nazis.

Guest Review: Inferno by Dan Brown

In fact “Inferno” has gathered all necessary conditions for good edition: cine plot, fashion for medieval, religious theories, Robert Langdon. Filmmakers are going to screen the book and of course it will be interesting to watch. “Inferno” is really interesting, fascinating and worth reading, if you like mysteries, puzzles and unexpected plot twists.

Fun Facts Friday: Jean-Jaques Rousseau

On this day in 1712 Genevan philosopher, composer and writer Jean-Jaques Rousseau (28 June, 1712 – 2 July, 1778) was born. Rousseau’s political philosophy influenced the French Revolution and modern politics. Even though Geneva is now in Switzerland, at the time Rousseau was born it was a city-state. Rousseau usually signed his books “Jean Jacques […]

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