Book Review: Promote Yourself: The New Rules for Career Success by Dan Schawbel

This book has aged, some of the specific advice is no longer relevant, as many are at this age where information moves so fast it changes on a monthly, weekly, daily, and even hourly basis. So it’s only expected that what was true about certain websites five years ago, is no longer so.

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Book Review: The Last Tourist by Olen Steinhauer

Milo Weaver, the reluctant spy, finds himself facing a CIA analyst about 10 years after the Department of Tourism, CIA’s silent assassins, was disbanded. The two find themselves on the run when a new breed of Tourists tries to kill them both.

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Fun Facts Friday: Howard Lindsay

Lindsay and Crouse won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for the play State of the Union (1946).

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Book Review: Captain Nemo by Kevin J. Anderson

This was a really enjoyable story, the narrative reads like a biography and not a fictional tale,

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Guest Post: 4 Books That Will Change Your Life

Words can be powerful. Most readers will know from experience that certain books and their ideas and philosophies have the ability to affect how you see the world. We have collected a handful of books that, regardless of time, age or setting, have a message that will impact your life for the better.

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Book Review: The Splendid and the Vile by Erik Larson

As a fan of the author, I had high hopes for this book. His talent of for extracting relevant, accurate, entertaining and informative information from the annals of history is something which I envy.

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Fun Facts Friday: Ovid

Ovid went to leave at the edge of the Roman Empire, by the Black Sea in Tomis (now Constanţa, Romania). As inventive as ever he learned the Getic language and wrote a poem to prize Augustus in that language.
That poem has not survived time, it probably would have been the only record of the Getic language.

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Book Review: Daughter of the Reich by Louise Fein

This novel was an easy read, and well researched. Much of the book isn’t historical per-say, which is why I don’t know if I’d categorize it as historical-fiction, but rather as a novel which takes place in the past.

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Book Review: The Names Heard Long Ago by Jonathan Wilson

Book Review: The Names Heard Long Ago by Jonathan Wilson

The Names Heard Long Ago: How the Golden Age of Hungarian Soccer Shaped the Modern Game by Jonathan Wilson recounts how the Hungary’s changed soccer and became a powerhouse exporting players and coaches to the world.

Book Review: The First Wave by Alex Kershaw

Book Review: The First Wave by Alex Kershaw

I enjoyed this book very much, it is very easy to read and Mr. Kershaw, as usual, goes out of his way to tell big stories in an intimate way. Even though I read numerous books bout D-Day, the individual accounts in this book were refreshing and help me get a better understanding of the success of these groups.

Fun Facts Friday: Edward Stratemeyer

Fun Facts Friday: Edward Stratemeyer

Edward Stratemeyer (4 October, 1862 – 10 May, 1930) was a writer, publisher, and creator of the Stratemeyer Syndicate that produced over 1,300 beloved novels, including the Nancy Drew, Hardy Boys, Tom Swift, and Bobbsey Twins series.

Book Review: The Ventriloquists by E.R. Ramzipoor

Book Review: The Ventriloquists by E.R. Ramzipoor

The cast of characters is well written and defined, the author keeps the book going using wit and conviction to tell a story which should not be lost to history.

Book Review: During-the-Event by Roger Wall

Book Review: During-the-Event by Roger Wall

I appreciated the way the author set up the post-apocalyptic world, from the beginning. The reader immediately understands the impact climate change had had on the country, the people, and the world. D.E. tells the story he was told by his grandfather, even though he was too young to remember those life changing events.

Fun Facts Friday: Louis Auchincloss

Fun Facts Friday: Louis Auchincloss

Louis Auchincloss (27 September, 1917 – 26 January, 2010) was a novelist, historian, and essayist from New York

Book Review: Quichotte by Salman Rushdie

Book Review: Quichotte by Salman Rushdie

Just as Cervantes made fun of the junk-culture in his era, Mr. Rushdie takes the challenge and goes to a literary war with the garbage that Americans are inundated with every minute of every day.

Book Review: The Nearest Exit by Olen Steinhauer

Book Review: The Nearest Exit by Olen Steinhauer

In The Nearest Exit by Olen Steinhauer bats the story out of the park again, with an unbelievable plot involving the CIA, Germany’s secret service as well as a guest appearances by the Ukrainians and Chinese.

Fun Facts Friday: Upton Sinclair

Fun Facts Friday: Upton Sinclair

Upton Sinclair (20 September, 1878 – 25 November, 1968) was an American writer, winner of the Pulitzer Prize, who published books in several genres.

Book Review: Dark Money by Jane Mayer

Book Review: Dark Money by Jane Mayer

The books is written in a simple, unemotional narrative which leads the reader to scratch their heads in amusement, or tear their hair out in anger.

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