Book Review: How to Lose the Information War by Nina Jankowicz

I have to give Ms. Jankowicz credit for not taking sides and attempting to be as bipartisan as possible. She writes about how many entities on the political spectrum in the US embrace Russian disinformation tactics to their advantage.

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Book Review: The Atlantis World by A.G. Riddle

I really enjoyed the overall premise to he series, but in this last book I’m not sure what the author wanted to convey, or if he had a trilogy planned out at all. It seemed like a bunch of story-lines thrown together for good measure, crossing fingers they would somehow work and make sense.

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Fun Facts Friday: M.F.K. Fisher

M.F.K. Fisher (3 July, 1908 – 22 June, 1992) was a food writer and translator. Ms. Fisher believed that eating well was one of the “arts of life”

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Book Review: The Revelators by Ace Atkins

The story revolves around Mexicans getting deported from a chicken plant, in an inhuman way which separates them from their children. Some children were kidnapped by gangs, getting sold to into the sex trade. What that, and several other subplots have to do with Quinn’s assassination attempt you’ll have to read for yourself.

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Book Review: The Atlantis Plague by A. G. Riddle

The second book in The Origin Mystery trilogy, a science-fiction story following a genealogist out to save the human race from the brink of extinction.

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Fun Facts Friday: Charlotte Zolotow

Charlotte Zolotow (26 June, 1915 – 19 November, 2013) was a prolific writer of children books, editor and poet. Mrs. Zolotow was a prolific children book author who did not shy away from examining difficult subjects.

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Book Review: The Last Sword Maker by Brian Nelson

To my surprise, this techno-fiction book became, about half way in, a world spanning espionage and intrigue story. Everything is drive, of course, by this new technology that would set the world into a new age that everyone wants to get their hands on.

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Book Review: I Belong to Vienna by Anna Goldenberg

The book is certainly worth reading, we should not be losing this kind of history, and future generations of the author’s family will have something that many others wish they did.

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Book Review: The Unexpected Spy by Tracy Walder and Jessica Anya Blau

Book Review: The Unexpected Spy by Tracy Walder and Jessica Anya Blau

This memoir by Tracy Walder nee Tracy Schandler tells of her time in the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), which recruited her right out of college. Ms. Schandler worked in counterterrorism after the September 11 terrorist attack on the World Trade Center and the insights she gives about the work her and her fellow patriots did at the CIA before and after.

Book Review: Comanche by Brett Riely

Book Review: Comanche by Brett Riely

There is lots of good banter, sometimes you can’t tell if the character is saying, thinking, or just gesturing (oh, you) but the author gets the feeling across efficiently and quickly which makes the reading much more pleasurable.

Fun Facts Friday: Benjamin Franklin

Fun Facts Friday: Benjamin Franklin

January 17 is the birthday of one of the most famous man in American History, Benjamin Franklin ( 17 January, 1706 – 17 April, 1790). I read Benjamin Franklin’s Biography by Walter Isaacson a few years ago and it is, to this day, a favorite of mine. Many people know that Mr. Franklin was a […]

Book Review: Grunt by Mary Roach

Book Review: Grunt by Mary Roach

About: Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War by Mary Roach is a nonfiction book which tackles subjects that challenge soldiers’ daily life, but are rarely thought about (unless it’s you wearing the uniform).  Ms. Roach, an award winning author, is known for her books which combine science and journalism. 288 pages Publisher: W. […]

Book Review: Shorefall by Robert Jackson Bennett

Book Review: Shorefall by Robert Jackson Bennett

The sequel expands not only on world building, societies, and technologies, but also questions what the author created. He explorers the reality of politics, faith, and of course the humanity of his characters.

Fun Facts Friday: Robinson Jeffers

Fun Facts Friday: Robinson Jeffers

Mr. Jeffers attended schools in Switzerland, Germany, and France and was fluent in three languages (English, French, and German) by the time he was 12 years old.

Book Review: Lux by Elizabeth Cook

Book Review: Lux by Elizabeth Cook

Ms. Cook has a great narrative through biblical women, most of them do not get a voice or to tell the story through their eyes. The author takes her time to demonstrate the power of repentance that occurs in King David after he commits adultery with Bathsheba.

Book Spotlight: Coffee Traveller by Fahad Ben. G

Book Spotlight: Coffee Traveller by Fahad Ben. G

A collection of musings about travel, life, love, family, relationships, the future and growing up in Saudi Arabia, by the author and poet Fahad Ben G. Buy Coffee Traveller  from Amazon.com*   Invisible lines tie me to you whether I like it or not.   No matter how much I travel away from you, no matter […]

Fun Facts Friday: J. R. R. Tolkien

Fun Facts Friday: J. R. R. Tolkien

Today he might be known for his work in fiction, but that was his side job. Even today Mr. Tolkien is considered to be one of the most renowned medieval scholars of all time, his publications are still considered a must in libraries.

Book Review: Edison by Edmund Morris

Book Review: Edison by Edmund Morris

“The cold he could stand with multiple layers of underwear, and the darkness he would one day do something about.”

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