Book Review: Exit Strategy by Martha Wells

Book 4 of 4 of The Murderbot Diaries tells of the humanization of Murderbot, a weaponized cyborg that became self-aware, one stop forward by making him… care about Dr. Mensah, who is in grave danger. But is Dr. Mensah his owner or friend?

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Fun Facts Friday: Arthur Conan Doyle

Arthur Conan Doyle ((22 May, 1859 – 7 July, 1930) was a Scottish author most famous for creating the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes.

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Book Review: The Greatest Beer Run Ever by John “Chickie” Donohue and J. T. Molloy

If this story wasn’t true it would have been unbelievable, falling squarely under the category of “if I knew what I was doing I wouldn’t do it”, a category which I am also, proudly or not, a member of.

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Guest Post: 7 Great Ways To Write Dialogue

Want to make sure that your characters’ dialogues make sense in your story? Are you receiving feedback saying that the dialogue is either awkward or unrealistic? Well, you’re not alone. All writers want to make dialogue more realistic and believable. With countless books and websites on writing fiction, chances are you’ll come across a section […]

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Book Review: Rogue Protocol by Martha Wells

While this book could be a standalone, I would highly recommend reading the first two. This novella would make a lot more sense, and would be much more enjoyable instead of reading it as a standalone book.

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Fun Facts Friday: Mikhail Bulgakov

Mikhail Bulgakov (15 May, 1891 – 10 March, 1940) was a Russian writer best known for his novel The Master and Margarita, which was published posthumously.

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Book Review: The Age of Plunder by W. G. Hoskins

Mr. Hoskins takes familiar aspects of the age, and peels them back to look at how people functioned within England, and within their own villages.

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Book Review: Artificial Condition by Martha Wells

The technological aspects that the author writers about are very creative, and one can see that she put in a lot of thought into them

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Book Review: Killing Patton by Bill O’Reilly & Martin Dugard 

Book Review: Killing Patton by Bill O’Reilly & Martin Dugard 

This book takes every gossip, rumor, and worst, historically discredited banality about  World War II and presents them as undisputed facts.

Fun Facts Friday: William Braithwaite

Fun Facts Friday: William Braithwaite

When, at age 15, the young Mr. Braithwaite was apprenticed to a typesetter he discovered his love to poetry and began to write his own literature.

Book Review: Manhunters by Steve Murphy and Javier F. Peña

Book Review: Manhunters by Steve Murphy and Javier F. Peña

About: Manhunters: How We Took Down Pablo Escobar, the World’s Most Wanted Criminal by Steve Murphy and Javier F. Peña is a memoir of the two Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agents who spent decades hunting drug traffickers. The two authors are the subject of the Netflix show Narcos, which follows their hunt for Pablo Escobar […]

Book Review: Alexander Von Humboldt by Maren Meinhardt

Book Review: Alexander Von Humboldt by Maren Meinhardt

This is a very readable book, exposing people to the “most celebrated scientist of the 19th century”.

Fun Facts Friday: C.S. Lewis

Fun Facts Friday: C.S. Lewis

Donating all the proceeds from his books to Christian charities, left Mr. Lewis struggling to pay the large tax bills.

Book Review: Agent Jack: The True Story of MI5’s Secret Nazi Hunter by Robert Hutton

Book Review: Agent Jack: The True Story of MI5’s Secret Nazi Hunter by Robert Hutton

The book is expertly researched with extensive notes and bibliographical information. There are many photos and illustrations throughout as well as a list of characters to make it easier to follow.

Book Review: A Futile and Stupid Gesture by Josh Karp

Book Review: A Futile and Stupid Gesture by Josh Karp

Attempts, and I believe succeeded, to capture the personality and intelligence of Mr. Kenney, even though, it seems, he was not aware of  his own comedic brilliance.

Fun Facts Friday: George Eliot

Fun Facts Friday: George Eliot

Eliot’s scandalous personal life clouded her reputation even after her death. Despite her literary achievements, Eliot was not allowed a memorial stone in Westminster Abbey’s Poets’ Corner. She finally received recognition there in 1980, one hundred years after her death.

Book Review: Fortune’s Child: A Novel of Empress Theodora by James Conroyd Martin

Book Review: Fortune’s Child: A Novel of Empress Theodora by James Conroyd Martin

We follow Theodora through childhood, daughter to window trying to make ends meet. Teenage and adulthood where the beautiful woman finds the bug of acting, but does not shy away from prostitution. She ties her fortunes to an upperclassman who has been given a governorship in Africa, but quickly finds out that meddling in affairs of the state will not earn her any friends.

Book Review: Justice in the West Bank? by Yonah Jeremy Bob

Book Review: Justice in the West Bank? by Yonah Jeremy Bob

I really enjoyed that the author concentrated on several personalities in the system, and their interaction on high-profile cases, some which changed the way the courts worked. It is an eye opening, balanced account in which Israeli and Palestinian lawyers, as well as IDF judges sometime find themselves at odds with the security apparatus.

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