Book Review: Promote Yourself: The New Rules for Career Success by Dan Schawbel

This book has aged, some of the specific advice is no longer relevant, as many are at this age where information moves so fast it changes on a monthly, weekly, daily, and even hourly basis. So it’s only expected that what was true about certain websites five years ago, is no longer so.

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Book Review: The Last Tourist by Olen Steinhauer

Milo Weaver, the reluctant spy, finds himself facing a CIA analyst about 10 years after the Department of Tourism, CIA’s silent assassins, was disbanded. The two find themselves on the run when a new breed of Tourists tries to kill them both.

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Fun Facts Friday: Howard Lindsay

Lindsay and Crouse won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for the play State of the Union (1946).

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Book Review: Captain Nemo by Kevin J. Anderson

This was a really enjoyable story, the narrative reads like a biography and not a fictional tale,

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Guest Post: 4 Books That Will Change Your Life

Words can be powerful. Most readers will know from experience that certain books and their ideas and philosophies have the ability to affect how you see the world. We have collected a handful of books that, regardless of time, age or setting, have a message that will impact your life for the better.

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Book Review: The Splendid and the Vile by Erik Larson

As a fan of the author, I had high hopes for this book. His talent of for extracting relevant, accurate, entertaining and informative information from the annals of history is something which I envy.

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Fun Facts Friday: Ovid

Ovid went to leave at the edge of the Roman Empire, by the Black Sea in Tomis (now Constanţa, Romania). As inventive as ever he learned the Getic language and wrote a poem to prize Augustus in that language.
That poem has not survived time, it probably would have been the only record of the Getic language.

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Book Review: Daughter of the Reich by Louise Fein

This novel was an easy read, and well researched. Much of the book isn’t historical per-say, which is why I don’t know if I’d categorize it as historical-fiction, but rather as a novel which takes place in the past.

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Book Review: A Matter of Interpretation by Elizabeth Mac Donald

Book Review: A Matter of Interpretation by Elizabeth Mac Donald

I was impressed by the research the author has done, rich historical details lend authenticity to the story, even when the paranormal is provoked (not very often, but just right). The narrative remains plausible and the characters seem true to their historical counterparts.

Book Review: Information Wars by Richard Stengel

Book Review: Information Wars by Richard Stengel

Mr. Stengel makes an excellent case about the first part of his subtitle, but sadly the second part “what can we do about it” is not convincing. Mostly because of the government bureaucracies, slow moving administrative machinery, and simply the way democracies work.

Fun Facts Friday: Henry Steele Commager

Fun Facts Friday: Henry Steele Commager

As a professional historian, Mr. Commager felt a duty to reach out to other citizens believing that an educated public would support liberal programs.

Book Review: A Hero Born (Legends of the Condor Heroes #1) by Jin Yong

Book Review: A Hero Born (Legends of the Condor Heroes #1) by Jin Yong

The Song Empire in the 13th century has lost half its territory, including the capital, to the Jurchen invaders.  While the war is raging, the peasants suffer and the great powers underestimate the Mongol warriors who are being untied by Genghis Khan.

Book Spotlight: How Fires End by Marco Rafalà

Book Spotlight: How Fires End by Marco Rafalà

A dark secret born out of World War II lies at the heart of a Sicilian American family in this emotional and sweeping saga of guilt, revenge, and, ultimately, redemption. After soldiers vacate the Sicilian hillside town of Melilli in the summer of 1943, the locals celebrate, giving thanks to their patron saint, Sebastian. Amid […]

Fun Facts Friday: Heinrich von Kleist

Fun Facts Friday: Heinrich von Kleist

Heinrich von Kleist (18, October 1777 – 21, November 1811) was a poet, novelist, writer and journalist from Germany.

Book Review: The First Stone by Carsten Jensen

Book Review: The First Stone by Carsten Jensen

A platoon of Danish soldiers, part of NATO forces, are hampered down in Afghanistan fighting the Taliban. Third platoon has a charismatic and brave leader, Schrøder, who answers to Colonel Steffensen. The two man are polar opposites.

The soldiers embark on a revenge mission, without realizing they are being set up by a traitor from within. Third platoon realizes that in war you have to make inconvenient allies, and embrace strange bedfellows just to survive the day.
If you’re lucky.

Book Review: The Second World War Illustrated by Jack Holroyd

Book Review: The Second World War Illustrated by Jack Holroyd

The book is full of pictures, many of which I have never seen, each one with an engrossing caption.

Book Review: The Binding by Bridget Collins

Book Review: The Binding by Bridget Collins

I was looking forward to reading more about the “binding”, how it worked, affected people and what is Emmett’s role in the whole magical realm the author created.

Fun Facts Friday: Elmore Leonard

Fun Facts Friday: Elmore Leonard

Elmore Leonard (11 October, 1925 – 20 August, 2013) was an American writer and screenwriter who specialized in thrillers and crime fiction.

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