Book Review: Exit Strategy by Martha Wells

Book 4 of 4 of The Murderbot Diaries tells of the humanization of Murderbot, a weaponized cyborg that became self-aware, one stop forward by making him… care about Dr. Mensah, who is in grave danger. But is Dr. Mensah his owner or friend?

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Fun Facts Friday: Arthur Conan Doyle

Arthur Conan Doyle ((22 May, 1859 – 7 July, 1930) was a Scottish author most famous for creating the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes.

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Book Review: The Greatest Beer Run Ever by John “Chickie” Donohue and J. T. Molloy

If this story wasn’t true it would have been unbelievable, falling squarely under the category of “if I knew what I was doing I wouldn’t do it”, a category which I am also, proudly or not, a member of.

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Guest Post: 7 Great Ways To Write Dialogue

Want to make sure that your characters’ dialogues make sense in your story? Are you receiving feedback saying that the dialogue is either awkward or unrealistic? Well, you’re not alone. All writers want to make dialogue more realistic and believable. With countless books and websites on writing fiction, chances are you’ll come across a section […]

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Book Review: Rogue Protocol by Martha Wells

While this book could be a standalone, I would highly recommend reading the first two. This novella would make a lot more sense, and would be much more enjoyable instead of reading it as a standalone book.

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Fun Facts Friday: Mikhail Bulgakov

Mikhail Bulgakov (15 May, 1891 – 10 March, 1940) was a Russian writer best known for his novel The Master and Margarita, which was published posthumously.

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Book Review: The Age of Plunder by W. G. Hoskins

Mr. Hoskins takes familiar aspects of the age, and peels them back to look at how people functioned within England, and within their own villages.

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Book Review: Artificial Condition by Martha Wells

The technological aspects that the author writers about are very creative, and one can see that she put in a lot of thought into them

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Book Review: Edison by Edmund Morris

Book Review: Edison by Edmund Morris

“The cold he could stand with multiple layers of underwear, and the darkness he would one day do something about.”

Guest Post: Easy Ways to Transition from Writer to Published Author

Guest Post: Easy Ways to Transition from Writer to Published Author

Writing is wonderful, especially when your work is praised and appreciated. However, even though there are not so many differences between blogging, writing for magazines or blogs, it comes with sacrifices and obstacles to overcome. Making the transition from writer to published author comes with a lot of work, perseverance, and commitment. You need to […]

Fun Facts Friday: Louis Bromfield

Fun Facts Friday: Louis Bromfield

The Green Bay Tree, his first novel, was an instant hit. In 1927 Mr. Bromfield won the Pulitzer Prize for his novel Early Autumn. In fact, all of his books, thirty in all, were best sellers and several were made into movies.

Book Review: A Die Hard Christmas: The Illustrated Holiday Classic by Doogie Horner

Book Review: A Die Hard Christmas: The Illustrated Holiday Classic by Doogie Horner

The artwork is great, second only to the wonderful wit and rhymes

Book Review: Eyewitness by Vladimir Pozner

Book Review: Eyewitness by Vladimir Pozner

The leaders of the coup was lead by hard line members of the Russian Communist Party who opposed the reforms Mr. Gorbachev was trying to implement. The coup was opposed by a short and effective campaign led by Boris Yeltsin, and after two days Gorbachev was back in power.

Fun Facts Friday: T.F. Powys

Fun Facts Friday: T.F. Powys

His first work, The Soliloquy of a Hermit, is a non-fiction book. The work is only 143, without chapters or sections. Each paragraph can be read independently, which showed the author as an unorthodox thinker

Book Review: The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alex E. Harrow

Book Review: The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alex E. Harrow

I enjoyed the narrative and the descriptive language very much, while the pacing is a bit slow I do appreciate the author taking her time to tell a good story.

Book Review: Gods and Generals by Jeff Shaara

Book Review: Gods and Generals by Jeff Shaara

Mr. Shaara chronicles the early successes of the Southern army, experiencing victories which dominated the landscape and headlines.

Fun Facts Friday: Heinrich Heine

Fun Facts Friday: Heinrich Heine

In 1831 Mr. Heine visited Paris and settled there. Paris had the cultural richness that he couldn’t get in the small towns in Germany. He soon became a celebrity in the whole of France.

Book Review: The Queens of Animation by Nathalia Holt

Book Review: The Queens of Animation by Nathalia Holt

Tells of several influential women who worked at Disney Studios in the early part of the 20th Century and later on, fighting the male dominated culture and making significant impact on the company.

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