Fun Facts Friday: Dr. Samuel Johnson

Dr. Samuel Johnson (18 September, 1709 – 12 December, 1784) was an English write, poet and essayist who has made large contributions to English literature.

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Book Review: A Lion in the Grass by Mark Zvonkovic

This was a surprising book, unlike many of the espionage novels I’ve read before. The story takes place over 70+ years in which the protagonist finds himself on the edge of history, like many of us do.

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Book Review: A Quiet Madness: A biographical novel of Edgar Allan Poe by John Isaac Jones

I don’t know much about Poe’s life, besides the bullet points many people are familiar with. I thought the author did a good job re imagining his life, habits, and most of all motivations. I especially enjoyed the chapter in which Poe wrote his most famous poem “The Raven” and how it came to be.

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Fun Facts Friday: O. Henry

O. Henry (11 September, 1862 – 5 June, 1910) was an American writer, known for his short stories.

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Book Review: Comrade Koba by Robert Littell

It is unclear what role Koba plays in Stalin’s government, except that he is a very high, and admired advisor. Koba, like Stalin, also came from Georgia and, like Stalin, excuses the crimes which the regime commits as a path to a greater “worker’s paradise”. It is a very interesting exercise to explain such concepts to an audience, especially if they’re ten year olds. Koba, at points, seem to be trying to convince himself of the deeds he is a part of, instead of convincing Leon

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Book Review: Stan Lee: A Life in Comics by Liel Leibovitz

This is a short biography on one of the most influential men in American pop-culture, and a true American success story. The book tries to tie Stan Lee’s stories and ideas to Jewish culture and Jewish religious book, some of the passages are a stretch, but all of them are interesting and show an understanding of the author of the characters he created.

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Fun Facts Friday: François-Auguste-René, vicomte de Chateaubriand

François-Auguste-René, vicomte de Chateaubriand (4 September, 1768 – 4 July, 1848) was a French author and diplomat, known as one of the first Romantic writes of his country.

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Book Review: Pont Neuf by Max Byrd

A historical fiction story following two female reports during World War II. Annie March arrives in France, 1944 after D-Day, her mentor is Martha Gellhorn, an ace reporter, editor, who is in a troubled marriage to writer Ernest Hemingway. Annie gets to know several soldiers and takes on photography to tell her story.

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Fun Facts Friday: Edmund Wilson

Fun Facts Friday: Edmund Wilson

His critique helped to interest the public in the works of Ernest Hemingway, John Dos Passos, William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Vladimir Nabokov, as well as establishing a new evaluation of the works of Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

Book Review: Beaming Up and Getting Off by Walter Koenig

Book Review: Beaming Up and Getting Off  by Walter Koenig

The book is filled with wonderful, self-deprecating humor (as is expected from any person of Jewish origin), wit and charm.  The author writes about his errors in judgement, the regrets he has for the few times (that he wrote about) acting like a “star”, he writes about the business he loves with a wink, but sadness of someone who has been through the wringer.

Book Review: All Systems Red by Martha Wells

Book Review: All Systems Red by Martha Wells

Even though this book is short, the world building is fantastic. The vision of a future that is run by corporations, with little if any input from governments, is eerie and scary.

Fun Facts Friday: John Crowe Ransom

Fun Facts Friday: John Crowe Ransom

As a faculty member at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio he founded the Kenyon Review and was its editor until he retired.

Book Review: While the Music Played by Nathaniel Lande

Book Review: While the Music Played by Nathaniel Lande

The author follows several people throughout the book, some famous, some well-known, and others are just trudging day to day trying to survive.

Book Review: The Abandonment of the West by Michael Kimmage

Book Review: The Abandonment of the West by Michael Kimmage

The author goes through what this idea meant and how it shaped our nation, and others. He goes to write about what the abandonment of this idea cost the United States in terms of principals, good will, influence, blood, and treasure.

Fun Facts Friday: Robert Penn Warren

Fun Facts Friday: Robert Penn Warren

Robert Penn Warren (24 April, 1905 – 15 September, 1989)) was an American novelist, critic, and poet laureate.

Guest Post: 5 Tips for Writing Best-Sellers

Guest Post: 5 Tips for Writing Best-Sellers

Writing a novel is certainly no mean feat – it takes a lot of time, effort, and a good deal of determination, too. Whether you are writing your first novel, your tenth, or just thinking about an idea you’ve had and whether to turn it into a book or not, you may be wondering what […]

Book Review: The Candy Bombers by Andrei Cherny 

Book Review: The Candy Bombers by Andrei Cherny 

About:               The Candy Bombers: The Untold Story of the Berlin Airlift and America’s Finest Hour by Andrei Cherny  is a non-fiction account of one of America’s greatest and successful humanitarian missions. Mr. Cherny is an author, lawyer, and businessman. 640 pages Publisher: Putnam Adult Language: English ISBN-10: 0399154965   My rat­ing for The Candy Bombers […]

Book Review: Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir

Book Review: Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir

This book is very unique, I enjoyed the dark humor, even though it took the book a bit to get going the story flowed smoothly

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