Book Review: Killing Patton by Bill O’Reilly & Martin Dugard 

This book takes every gossip, rumor, and worst, historically discredited banality about  World War II and presents them as undisputed facts.

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Fun Facts Friday: William Braithwaite

When, at age 15, the young Mr. Braithwaite was apprenticed to a typesetter he discovered his love to poetry and began to write his own literature.

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Book Review: Manhunters by Steve Murphy and Javier F. Peña

About: Manhunters: How We Took Down Pablo Escobar, the World’s Most Wanted Criminal by Steve Murphy and Javier F. Peña is a memoir of the two Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agents who spent decades hunting drug traffickers. The two authors are the subject of the Netflix show Narcos, which follows their hunt for Pablo Escobar […]

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Book Review: Alexander Von Humboldt by Maren Meinhardt

This is a very readable book, exposing people to the “most celebrated scientist of the 19th century”.

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Fun Facts Friday: C.S. Lewis

Donating all the proceeds from his books to Christian charities, left Mr. Lewis struggling to pay the large tax bills.

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Book Review: Agent Jack: The True Story of MI5’s Secret Nazi Hunter by Robert Hutton

The book is expertly researched with extensive notes and bibliographical information. There are many photos and illustrations throughout as well as a list of characters to make it easier to follow.

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Book Review: A Futile and Stupid Gesture by Josh Karp

Attempts, and I believe succeeded, to capture the personality and intelligence of Mr. Kenney, even though, it seems, he was not aware of  his own comedic brilliance.

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Fun Facts Friday: George Eliot

Eliot’s scandalous personal life clouded her reputation even after her death. Despite her literary achievements, Eliot was not allowed a memorial stone in Westminster Abbey’s Poets’ Corner. She finally received recognition there in 1980, one hundred years after her death.

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Book Review: Lift by Daniel Kunitz

Book Review: Lift by Daniel Kunitz

The author’s narrative is dry at times, but it was tight and well written. The issue I have with this book is that I felt cheated after starting to read.

Fun Facts Friday: Emma Lazarus

Fun Facts Friday: Emma Lazarus

Emma Lazarus (22 July, 1849 – 19 November, 1887) was an American poet known for her 1883 sonnet The New Colossus which is inscribed on a bronze plaque being held by the Statue of Liberty. By T. Johnson – The New York Historical Society [1][2], Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=275227 1)      Ms. Lazarus was one of seven […]

Book Review: Harem by Alev Lytle Croutier

Book Review: Harem by Alev Lytle Croutier

The author writes about how harems worked, the occupants and the politics of them.

Excerpt from Unholy Code by Thomas Waite

Excerpt from Unholy Code by Thomas Waite

Acclaimed novelist Thomas Waite shares this short excerpt from Unholy Code, the latest thriller in his Lana Elkins series.   “Look at the water, boy.” Vinko peered at its smooth surface and saw his reflection. “Your face is white as the clouds, isn’t it? Just like everyone else you see around here.” Vinko understood. He’d never […]

Fun Facts Friday: Clement Clarke Moore

Fun Facts Friday: Clement Clarke Moore

Mr. Moore was an ardent opponent and protested against the development of the street grid as proposed by the government of New York. He thought it was a conspiracy to increase political patronage and appease the working class.

Book Review: The Book of Aron by Jim Shepard

Book Review: The Book of Aron by Jim Shepard

This is not an uplifting book, but it is a very interesting story and about a young boy, in his formative years living in the Warsaw Ghetto

Book Review: Hitman Anders and the Meaning of It All by Jonas Jonasson

Book Review: Hitman Anders and the Meaning of It All by Jonas Jonasson

This is a fun book, a great satire and a good read

Fun Facts Friday: Charles Reade

Fun Facts Friday: Charles Reade

Charles Reade (8 June, 1814 – 11 April, 1884) was an English dramatist and novelist. Mr. Read is best known for his novel The Cloister and the Hearth. “Charles Reade,” (1872)  illustrated by Frederick Waddy (1848–1901)  WorldCat – archive.org, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=12460317 1)      Mr. Reade considered himself a dramatist and wanted that be firs on […]

Graphic Novel Review: James Bond: Vargr by Warren Ellis and Jason Masters

Graphic Novel Review: James Bond: Vargr by Warren Ellis and Jason Masters

James Bond, agent 007 of British Secret Service, returns to London from a vengeance mission in Helsinki and resumes the boring duties of the 00 section. Soon enough he gets a new mission, this time in Berlin to break a drug trafficking cartel.

Book Review: The Unspeakable Crimes of Dr. Petiot by Thomas Maeder

Book Review: The Unspeakable Crimes of Dr. Petiot by Thomas Maeder

About: The Unspeakable Crimes of Dr. Petiot by Thomas Maeder is a non-fiction crime book taking place in France during World War II. My rat­ing for The Unspeakable Crimes of Dr. Petiot — 4 Buy The Unspeakable Crimes of Dr. Petiot from Amazon.com* More Books by Jonathan Rabb Thoughts: The Unspeakable Crimes of Dr. Petiot by Thomas Maeder […]

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