Book Review: The National Parks: America’s Best Idea by Dayton Duncan and Ken Burns

Even if you don’t have a passion for the outdoors, or not a fan of America’s National Parks this book will certainly entertain you. It is an easy read with excellent pictures from the old and recent days.

Read More

Fun Facts Friday: Jack London

Jack London (12 January, 1876 – 22 November 1916) was an American writer and journalist. Some of his most famous works are White Fang and The Call of the Wild. Books by Jack London* 1)      He was born as John Griffith London in San Francisco, to Flora Wellman, an unwedded woman of wealthy means. Flora later […]

Read More

Book Review: Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi

About: Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi is a novel from this award winning author. This is the author’s second novel. 304 pages Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Language: English ISBN-10: 0544944607 My rating for Call Me Zebra – 4 Buy Call Me Zebra from Amazon.com* More Books by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi Thoughts: I have no idea […]

Read More

Graphic Novel Review: Harley Quinn Vol. 2: Power Outage (The New 52) by Amanda Conner and‎ Jimmy Palmiotti

I enjoyed the stories were the fourth wall is being broken and Harley is out in the real world, my favorite was the story where she goes to Comic-Con, it was very funny and I’m sure there were many gags I didn’t even get (bonus points for including Bruce Timm and Paul Dini).

Read More

Fun Facts Friday: Umberto Eco

Mr. Eco said that social media “gives legions of idiots the right to speak when they once only spoke at a bar after a glass of wine, without harming the community […] but now they

Read More

Book Review: Daughters of the Night Sky by Aimie K. Runyan

About: Daughters of the Night Sky by Aimie K. Runyan is a novel about the Russian women pilots of World War II known by their victims as the “Night Witches”.  Ms. Runyan likes to write about history’s unsung heroes, or at least unsung in the US. 301 pages Publisher: Lake Union Publishing (January 1, 2018) Language: English ISBN-10: 1503946770 […]

Read More

Book Review: Silence in the Desert by David Longridge

About: Silence in the Desert by David Longridge is a historical fiction story taking place around World War II. The novel follows four friends, on opposite sides serving different masters during the war. 304 pages Publisher: Troubador Publishing Ltd Language: English ISBN-10: 1788034503 My rating for Silence in the Desert– 3 Buy Silence in the Desert from Amazon.com* More Books […]

Read More

Happy New Year

Read More

Fun Facts Friday: Arthur Rackham

Fun Facts Friday: Arthur Rackham

Arthur Rackham (19 September, 1867 – 6 September, 1939) was an English book illustrator whose work is still sought out today. In an era which was called the “golden age” of illustrations, Rackham was one of the most prolific and known illustrators. Instead of “fun facts”, I thought I’d share some of Mr. Rackham’s wonderful work.

Book Review: The Jew Store by Stella Suberman

Book Review: The Jew Store by Stella Suberman

The book is not only a memoir, but a commentary about the life in a small southern town circa the 1920s. A town where almost everyone never even saw a Jew nevertheless interacted with one.

Twitter Roundup for Week Ending September 13, 2014

Twitter Roundup for Week Ending September 13, 2014

The American novels that should have won the Booker prize gu.com/p/4xfng/tw via @guardian Woman arrested for overdue library book | CBS 58 | Local News cbs58.com/news/local-new… A new post of Fun Facts Friday: Michael Ondaatje manoflabook.com/wp/?p=11483#FunFacts RT @brainpicker: We lost David Foster Wallace six years ago today – his timeless wisdom on writing and how […]

Fun Facts Friday: Michael Ondaatje

Fun Facts Friday: Michael Ondaatje

The protagonist of The English Patient, Hana, is the daughter of the protagonist from an earlier novel Mr. Onadaatje wrote called the In the Skin of the Lion.

Book Review: City of Thieves by David Benioff

Book Review: City of Thieves by David Benioff

This book has a lot to offer, it is a war story, a coming of age triumph, a serious look at the Siege of Leningrad with lots of humor and best of all, historically accurate. I enjoyed reading this book very much and would recommend it wholly.

Book Review: Herzl’s Vision by Shlomo Avineri

Book Review: Herzl’s Vision by Shlomo Avineri

I was actually surprised to learn that Herzl cemented himself as a leading force in the Zionist movement in only 9 years, which is the time the book covers. In an aberration from conventional teachings, Mr. Avneri refutes that Herzl’s evolution of thought was not, as taught, out of the Dreyfus affair (which he covered as a reporter) but a gradual process.

Twitter Update for Week Ending 6 September, 2014

Twitter Update for Week Ending 6 September, 2014

Next week I’ll be starting my Masters program, that means less time to read and blog. Even though I will keep up writing posts, I’m sure it’s not going to be in the same frequency, so my apologies to all who are waiting for me to read their books.

Fun Facts Friday: On the Road by Jack Kerouac

Fun Facts Friday: On the Road by Jack Kerouac

The end of the original scroll is a ragged edge where Kerouac wrote “Ate by Patchkee, a dog”, so no one really knows the original ending.

Book Review: The Crying Tree by Naseem Rakha

Book Review: The Crying Tree by Naseem Rakha

Even though I liked this book, and it is a well written novel, the message the author tries attempts to send (personal forgiveness and redemption) seems a bit heavy handed at times and the ending, which to me was mostly predictable. The author handles multiple timelines well and even though the chapters not only jump from time, but also to a different place and characters it all seems to fit and not disjointed at all.

Book Review: A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini

Book Review: A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini

There are many well described aspects which surround the story: familial roles, household chores division, raising children, religion and more. The author tries to accentuate the harshness that some women have in their life and that no matter what they’ll do, they’ll never get ahead because of how they grew up and /or who they were born to.