Fun Facts Friday: Shirley Jackson

American author Shirley Jackson (14 December, 1916 -8 August, 1965) born on this day. She is best known for her excellent short story The Lottery. Books by Shirley Jackson* 1 ) Jackson believed in white and black magic 2 ) The author influenced Stephen King and Neil Gaiman 3 ) Jackson’s husband, Stanley Hyman, is […]

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Book Review: Code Name: Lise: The True Story of the Woman Who Became WWII’s Most Highly Decorated Spy by Larry Loftis

About: Code Name: Lise: The True Story of the Woman Who Became WWII’s Most Highly Decorated Spy by Larry Loftis is a non-fiction book about a British spy operating in occupied France. Mr. Lofits was a corporate attorney, but is now a full time writer. 384 pages Publisher: Gallery Books Language: English ISBN-10: 1501198653 My […]

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Graphic Novel Review: Red Lanterns Vol. 1: Blood and Rage by Peter Milligan

About: Red Lanterns Vol. 1: Blood and Rage by Peter Milligan (illustrated by Ed Benes) is a graphic novel, part of The New 52 storyline by DC Comics. This graphic novel collects issues #1-6 of Red Lanterns. 160 pages Publisher: DC Comics Language: English ISBN-10: 1401234917   My rating for Red Lanterns Vol. 1: Blood and […]

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Fun Facts Friday: Willa Cather

Today is the birthday of Pulitzer prize winning American author Willa Cather (7 December, 1873 – 24, April, 1947). Even though Cather is associated with the pioneer spirit, she lived most of her life in New York city. Books by Willa Cather* 1 ) Ms. Cather often lied about the year she was born in. […]

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Book Review: Atlas of World War II by Stephen G. Hyslop and Neil Kagan

About: Atlas of World War II: History’s Greatest Conflict Revealed Through Rare Wartime Maps and New Cartography by Stephen G. Hyslop and Neil Kagan (foreword by Kenneth W. Rendell) is a hardcover book featuring maps, photographs, documents,and eyewitness accounts. 256 pages Publisher: National Geographic; Comprehensive edition Language: English ISBN-10: 1426219717 My rating for Atlas of […]

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Book Review: The Banker and the Blackfoot by J. Edward Chamberlin

The author goes on to tell about the history of the West and the relationships between the Mounties (police), the Natives, and the settlers. Even though the Canadians did not have the issues that the US struggled with, they still managed to break their promises to the First Nation.

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Book Review: Bill Duke: My 40-Year Career on Screen and Behind the Camera

About: Bill Duke: My 40-Year Career on Screen and Behind the Camera is a memoir of the prolific actor and director. Mr. Duke has been in many movies which are now considered pop-culture classics (American Gigolo, Commando, Predator, X-Men), he is also a director, producer and entrepreneur. 232 pages Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers Language: […]

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Fun Facts Friday: Jonathan Swift

Jonathan Swift (30 November, 1667 – 19 October, 1745) was an English satirist, essayist, poet, and pamphleteer. Mr. Swift is remembered for his prose and satire in works like Gulliver’s Travels. Books by Jonathan Swift* Mr. Swift was born in Dublin, Ireland. His father, Jonathan Swift, was a lawyer. At Dublin University (Trinity College, Dublin) […]

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Book Review: The Festival of Insignificance by Milan Kundera

Book Review: The Festival of Insignificance by Milan Kundera

I laughed here and there, but I found the book to be more thought provoking than funny. I’m glad the philosophical discussions in the book weren’t much longer, even though they were fascinating.

Famous Literary Fathers

Famous Literary Fathers

Happy Father’s Day to all. While moms get much literary and live love, and rightly so, father’s are no slouches either. The media gave fathers a reputation for being bumbling, grown up kids, but we all know that’s not true, even though some of us have lovingly embraced the stereotype. This Father’s Day I thought I’d […]

Fun Facts Friday: Salman Rushdie

Fun Facts Friday: Salman Rushdie

When The Satanic Verses came out several book stores in England and the US had bomb scares, two Islamic clerics were murdered for publicly questioning the fatwa and book burnings were held throughout the world.
Even the most astute PR firm could come up with such brilliant marketing.

Book Review: New World by Andrew Motion

Book Review: New World by Andrew Motion

It is a brave endeavor to write a sequel or a prequel to existing, classic novels and Mr. Motion does justice to Stevenson’s style and story.

Giveaway: The Wrong Man by Kate White

Giveaway: The Wrong Man by Kate White

Adrenaline-charged and filled with harrowing twists at every turn, The Wrong Man will keep readers riveted until the final page.

Book Review: The Black Count by Tom Reiss

Book Review: The Black Count by Tom Reiss

It is clear that the author developed a great admiration towards General Dumas, a bastard son of a nobleman, born to a slave on the island of Saint-Domingue and rising to be a hero of the French Republic, albeit forgotten.

Friday Facts: Anne Frank

Friday Facts: Anne Frank

Anne Frank’s Diary was published in 67 languages and is considered one of the best first-hand experiences of the war from a unique Jewish perspective.

Book Review: Wicked by Gregory Maguire

Book Review: Wicked by Gregory Maguire

I found this book mediocre and somewhat disjointed. Yet, I found it strangely interesting – maybe because I think that the idea is brilliant and the overall story is good.

Book Review: A Deadly Wandering by Matt Richtel

Book Review: A Deadly Wandering by Matt Richtel

What scientists were, and to some degree still are, figuring out is that constant emails and texts appeal to a primitive part of the brain which is on constant lookout for a change in the environment because it might be important.

Twitter Roundup for Week Ending 6 June, 2015

Twitter Roundup for Week Ending 6 June, 2015

Some of my favorite tweets from the past week