Fun Facts Friday: Dr. Samuel Johnson

Dr. Samuel Johnson (18 September, 1709 – 12 December, 1784) was an English write, poet and essayist who has made large contributions to English literature.

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Book Review: A Lion in the Grass by Mark Zvonkovic

This was a surprising book, unlike many of the espionage novels I’ve read before. The story takes place over 70+ years in which the protagonist finds himself on the edge of history, like many of us do.

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Book Review: A Quiet Madness: A biographical novel of Edgar Allan Poe by John Isaac Jones

I don’t know much about Poe’s life, besides the bullet points many people are familiar with. I thought the author did a good job re imagining his life, habits, and most of all motivations. I especially enjoyed the chapter in which Poe wrote his most famous poem “The Raven” and how it came to be.

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Fun Facts Friday: O. Henry

O. Henry (11 September, 1862 – 5 June, 1910) was an American writer, known for his short stories.

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Book Review: Comrade Koba by Robert Littell

It is unclear what role Koba plays in Stalin’s government, except that he is a very high, and admired advisor. Koba, like Stalin, also came from Georgia and, like Stalin, excuses the crimes which the regime commits as a path to a greater “worker’s paradise”. It is a very interesting exercise to explain such concepts to an audience, especially if they’re ten year olds. Koba, at points, seem to be trying to convince himself of the deeds he is a part of, instead of convincing Leon

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Book Review: Stan Lee: A Life in Comics by Liel Leibovitz

This is a short biography on one of the most influential men in American pop-culture, and a true American success story. The book tries to tie Stan Lee’s stories and ideas to Jewish culture and Jewish religious book, some of the passages are a stretch, but all of them are interesting and show an understanding of the author of the characters he created.

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Fun Facts Friday: François-Auguste-René, vicomte de Chateaubriand

François-Auguste-René, vicomte de Chateaubriand (4 September, 1768 – 4 July, 1848) was a French author and diplomat, known as one of the first Romantic writes of his country.

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Book Review: Pont Neuf by Max Byrd

A historical fiction story following two female reports during World War II. Annie March arrives in France, 1944 after D-Day, her mentor is Martha Gellhorn, an ace reporter, editor, who is in a troubled marriage to writer Ernest Hemingway. Annie gets to know several soldiers and takes on photography to tell her story.

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Fun Facts Friday: G.K. Chesterton

Fun Facts Friday: G.K. Chesterton

G.K. Chesterton (29 May, 1874 – 14 June, 1936) was an English writer, theologian, critic, and philosopher. Mr. Chesterton’s most famous creating is the priest-detective Father Brown. Books by G.K. Chesterton* He was born as Gilbert Keith Chesterton in Campden Hill, Kensington, an affluent district of London, England. Mr. Chesterton was educated at St. Paul’s, […]

Book Review: No hesitation by Kirk Russell

Book Review: No hesitation by Kirk Russell

The acts might or might not be proper, as our minds cannot follow the AI’s logic or how it attempts to foresee the future. The two programmers in the story act as a collective conscious of creators who regret their creation, that is out of the control

Book Review: Exit Strategy by Martha Wells

Book Review: Exit Strategy by Martha Wells

Book 4 of 4 of The Murderbot Diaries tells of the humanization of Murderbot, a weaponized cyborg that became self-aware, one stop forward by making him… care about Dr. Mensah, who is in grave danger. But is Dr. Mensah his owner or friend?

Fun Facts Friday: Arthur Conan Doyle

Fun Facts Friday: Arthur Conan Doyle

Arthur Conan Doyle ((22 May, 1859 – 7 July, 1930) was a Scottish author most famous for creating the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes.

Book Review: The Greatest Beer Run Ever by John “Chickie” Donohue and J. T. Molloy

Book Review: The Greatest Beer Run Ever by John “Chickie” Donohue and J. T. Molloy

If this story wasn’t true it would have been unbelievable, falling squarely under the category of “if I knew what I was doing I wouldn’t do it”, a category which I am also, proudly or not, a member of.

Guest Post: 7 Great Ways To Write Dialogue

Guest Post: 7 Great Ways To Write Dialogue

Want to make sure that your characters’ dialogues make sense in your story? Are you receiving feedback saying that the dialogue is either awkward or unrealistic? Well, you’re not alone. All writers want to make dialogue more realistic and believable. With countless books and websites on writing fiction, chances are you’ll come across a section […]

Book Review: Rogue Protocol by Martha Wells

Book Review: Rogue Protocol by Martha Wells

While this book could be a standalone, I would highly recommend reading the first two. This novella would make a lot more sense, and would be much more enjoyable instead of reading it as a standalone book.

Fun Facts Friday: Mikhail Bulgakov

Fun Facts Friday: Mikhail Bulgakov

Mikhail Bulgakov (15 May, 1891 – 10 March, 1940) was a Russian writer best known for his novel The Master and Margarita, which was published posthumously.

Book Review: The Age of Plunder by W. G. Hoskins

Book Review: The Age of Plunder by W. G. Hoskins

Mr. Hoskins takes familiar aspects of the age, and peels them back to look at how people functioned within England, and within their own villages.

Book Review: Artificial Condition by Martha Wells

Book Review: Artificial Condition by Martha Wells

The technological aspects that the author writers about are very creative, and one can see that she put in a lot of thought into them

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