Book Review: The Last Tourist by Olen Steinhauer

Milo Weaver, the reluctant spy, finds himself facing a CIA analyst about 10 years after the Department of Tourism, CIA’s silent assassins, was disbanded. The two find themselves on the run when a new breed of Tourists tries to kill them both.

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Fun Facts Friday: Howard Lindsay

Lindsay and Crouse won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for the play State of the Union (1946).

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Book Review: Captain Nemo by Kevin J. Anderson

This was a really enjoyable story, the narrative reads like a biography and not a fictional tale,

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Guest Post: 4 Books That Will Change Your Life

Words can be powerful. Most readers will know from experience that certain books and their ideas and philosophies have the ability to affect how you see the world. We have collected a handful of books that, regardless of time, age or setting, have a message that will impact your life for the better.

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Book Review: The Splendid and the Vile by Erik Larson

As a fan of the author, I had high hopes for this book. His talent of for extracting relevant, accurate, entertaining and informative information from the annals of history is something which I envy.

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Fun Facts Friday: Ovid

Ovid went to leave at the edge of the Roman Empire, by the Black Sea in Tomis (now Constanţa, Romania). As inventive as ever he learned the Getic language and wrote a poem to prize Augustus in that language.
That poem has not survived time, it probably would have been the only record of the Getic language.

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Book Review: Daughter of the Reich by Louise Fein

This novel was an easy read, and well researched. Much of the book isn’t historical per-say, which is why I don’t know if I’d categorize it as historical-fiction, but rather as a novel which takes place in the past.

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Book Review: The Lost Book of Adana Moreau by Michael Zapata

The author builds the story in multiple layers, orphans, diaspora, multiple Earths, and more importantly the way past generations influence future ones in ways which they never imagined.

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Fun Facts Friday: Heinrich Heine

Fun Facts Friday: Heinrich Heine

In 1831 Mr. Heine visited Paris and settled there. Paris had the cultural richness that he couldn’t get in the small towns in Germany. He soon became a celebrity in the whole of France.

Book Review: The Queens of Animation by Nathalia Holt

Book Review: The Queens of Animation by Nathalia Holt

Tells of several influential women who worked at Disney Studios in the early part of the 20th Century and later on, fighting the male dominated culture and making significant impact on the company.

Book Review: Killing Patton by Bill O’Reilly & Martin Dugard 

Book Review: Killing Patton by Bill O’Reilly & Martin Dugard 

This book takes every gossip, rumor, and worst, historically discredited banality about  World War II and presents them as undisputed facts.

Fun Facts Friday: William Braithwaite

Fun Facts Friday: William Braithwaite

When, at age 15, the young Mr. Braithwaite was apprenticed to a typesetter he discovered his love to poetry and began to write his own literature.

Book Review: Manhunters by Steve Murphy and Javier F. Peña

Book Review: Manhunters by Steve Murphy and Javier F. Peña

About: Manhunters: How We Took Down Pablo Escobar, the World’s Most Wanted Criminal by Steve Murphy and Javier F. Peña is a memoir of the two Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agents who spent decades hunting drug traffickers. The two authors are the subject of the Netflix show Narcos, which follows their hunt for Pablo Escobar […]

Book Review: Alexander Von Humboldt by Maren Meinhardt

Book Review: Alexander Von Humboldt by Maren Meinhardt

This is a very readable book, exposing people to the “most celebrated scientist of the 19th century”.

Fun Facts Friday: C.S. Lewis

Fun Facts Friday: C.S. Lewis

Donating all the proceeds from his books to Christian charities, left Mr. Lewis struggling to pay the large tax bills.

Book Review: Agent Jack: The True Story of MI5’s Secret Nazi Hunter by Robert Hutton

Book Review: Agent Jack: The True Story of MI5’s Secret Nazi Hunter by Robert Hutton

The book is expertly researched with extensive notes and bibliographical information. There are many photos and illustrations throughout as well as a list of characters to make it easier to follow.

Book Review: A Futile and Stupid Gesture by Josh Karp

Book Review: A Futile and Stupid Gesture by Josh Karp

Attempts, and I believe succeeded, to capture the personality and intelligence of Mr. Kenney, even though, it seems, he was not aware of  his own comedic brilliance.

Fun Facts Friday: George Eliot

Fun Facts Friday: George Eliot

Eliot’s scandalous personal life clouded her reputation even after her death. Despite her literary achievements, Eliot was not allowed a memorial stone in Westminster Abbey’s Poets’ Corner. She finally received recognition there in 1980, one hundred years after her death.

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