Book Review: Exit Strategy by Martha Wells

Book 4 of 4 of The Murderbot Diaries tells of the humanization of Murderbot, a weaponized cyborg that became self-aware, one stop forward by making him… care about Dr. Mensah, who is in grave danger. But is Dr. Mensah his owner or friend?

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Fun Facts Friday: Arthur Conan Doyle

Arthur Conan Doyle ((22 May, 1859 – 7 July, 1930) was a Scottish author most famous for creating the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes.

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Book Review: The Greatest Beer Run Ever by John “Chickie” Donohue and J. T. Molloy

If this story wasn’t true it would have been unbelievable, falling squarely under the category of “if I knew what I was doing I wouldn’t do it”, a category which I am also, proudly or not, a member of.

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Guest Post: 7 Great Ways To Write Dialogue

Want to make sure that your characters’ dialogues make sense in your story? Are you receiving feedback saying that the dialogue is either awkward or unrealistic? Well, you’re not alone. All writers want to make dialogue more realistic and believable. With countless books and websites on writing fiction, chances are you’ll come across a section […]

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Book Review: Rogue Protocol by Martha Wells

While this book could be a standalone, I would highly recommend reading the first two. This novella would make a lot more sense, and would be much more enjoyable instead of reading it as a standalone book.

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Fun Facts Friday: Mikhail Bulgakov

Mikhail Bulgakov (15 May, 1891 – 10 March, 1940) was a Russian writer best known for his novel The Master and Margarita, which was published posthumously.

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Book Review: The Age of Plunder by W. G. Hoskins

Mr. Hoskins takes familiar aspects of the age, and peels them back to look at how people functioned within England, and within their own villages.

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Book Review: Artificial Condition by Martha Wells

The technological aspects that the author writers about are very creative, and one can see that she put in a lot of thought into them

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Book Spotlight: The Hidden Key by David E. Grogan

Book Spotlight: The Hidden Key by David E. Grogan

When Navy veteran Kevin Jones answers the door for two men he doesn’t know, he can’t foresee the Pandora’s Box he’s opening. One week later, attorney Steve Stilwell meets with a billionaire businessman in a London eatery. As two men burst into the restaurant, Steve’s new client cries out “I’ve sold my soul.” Moments later he is dead, leaving Steve to figure out why.

Book Review: 100 Drives, 5,000 Ideas (2020 Edition) by Joe Yogerst

Book Review: 100 Drives, 5,000 Ideas (2020 Edition) by Joe Yogerst

100 Drives, 5,000 Ideas: Where to Go, When to Go, What to Do, What to See by Joe Yogerst gives the reader excellent ideas of where to go and what to do within their geographical area (for our family, we figure about 100 miles one way, for a day trip). The book also has great tips for those who like to do more than to drive, but bike, camp, hike, etc.

Guest Post: Edgar Allan Poe: The Fall of the House of Usher Examined by Ren Zelen

Guest Post: Edgar Allan Poe: The Fall of the House of Usher Examined by Ren Zelen

Central to this story is that fact that Roderick and the Lady Madeline are twins, this suggests that when he buries her, he hopes that death will somehow separate them. However, this act of division between the living and the dead merely culminates in the Fall of the House of Usher. When Roderick tries to rid himself of his twin half, he is, in effect, signing his own death warrant. 

Fun Facts Friday: John Tenniel

Fun Facts Friday: John Tenniel

Tenniel was honored as a living national treasure and for his public service was knighted in 1893 by Queen Victoria, the first cartoonist or illustrator to receive the honor.

Book Review: Wolf by Herbert J. Stern and Alan A. Winter

Book Review: Wolf by Herbert J. Stern and Alan A. Winter

Through Friedrich we are witnessing one of the ugliest events of the 20th century, from the front seat. Friedrich is privy to many meetings and has a personal insight into Hitler’s taking over Germany

Book Review: Eat Sleep Work Repeat by Bruce Daisley

Book Review: Eat Sleep Work Repeat by Bruce Daisley

In Eat Sleep Work Repeat: 30 Hacks for Bringing Joy to Your Job by Bruce Daisley the author does not only concentrate on cultural changes which, let’s face it, most of us are not in a position to implement, but also on little changes you can make to make your work life more manageable.

Book Review: All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

Book Review: All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque does not glamorize war, it is not a battle zone fantasy a-la 80s Hollywood action flicks. It is a sad and sober reflection on the toll war takes on individual soldiers, their families, society, and country. In fact, the Nazis hated this book so much, and the movie, that they banned it altogether.

Fun Facts Friday: R.P. Blackmur

Fun Facts Friday: R.P. Blackmur

His literary reputation was not only based on criticism, but also on the poetry Mr. Blackmur wrote.

Guest Post: Contests and Awards by Chris Harold Stevenson

Guest Post: Contests and Awards by Chris Harold Stevenson

How much does talent have to do with copping a win? Fortunately a great book will stand out whether it is picked by a panel of judges or a reader’s poll. It is subjective and a matter of personalized opinion. Yet the wheat will win over the chaff. Every time. 

Book Review: The Blue Zones Kitchen by Dan Buettner

Book Review: The Blue Zones Kitchen by Dan Buettner

The photographs are gorgeous and the write ups are very interesting. It is important to note that the diet of Blue Zone residents is only part of the reason for thier longevity, climate, reasonable amount of exercise, family, work, and relationships all have a big say in getting to old age

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