Book Review: Eat Sleep Work Repeat by Bruce Daisley

In Eat Sleep Work Repeat: 30 Hacks for Bringing Joy to Your Job by Bruce Daisley the author does not only concentrate on cultural changes which, let’s face it, most of us are not in a position to implement, but also on little changes you can make to make your work life more manageable.

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Book Review: All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque does not glamorize war, it is not a battle zone fantasy a-la 80s Hollywood action flicks. It is a sad and sober reflection on the toll war takes on individual soldiers, their families, society, and country. In fact, the Nazis hated this book so much, and the movie, that they banned it altogether.

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Fun Facts Friday: R.P. Blackmur

His literary reputation was not only based on criticism, but also on the poetry Mr. Blackmur wrote.

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Guest Post: Contests and Awards by Chris Harold Stevenson

How much does talent have to do with copping a win? Fortunately a great book will stand out whether it is picked by a panel of judges or a reader’s poll. It is subjective and a matter of personalized opinion. Yet the wheat will win over the chaff. Every time. 

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Book Review: The Blue Zones Kitchen by Dan Buettner

The photographs are gorgeous and the write ups are very interesting. It is important to note that the diet of Blue Zone residents is only part of the reason for thier longevity, climate, reasonable amount of exercise, family, work, and relationships all have a big say in getting to old age

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Book Review: The Fire and the Darkness by Sinclair McKay

The author does not shy away from the controversy surrounding the bombing. Was it necessary? Was it a war crime? A crime against humanity? How did the people who ordered the bombing as well as those executing the orders deal with the morality of it?

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Guest Post: 5 True Ray Bradbury’s Predictions about the Future Technologies

Ray Bradbury is one of the science fiction pioneers who cleverly envisaged a brand new world and its reliance on cutting-edge technologies. In his famous dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451 – published way back in 1953 – Bradbury predicted a wide range of high-tech phenomena that turned out to be true a few decades later. A […]

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Book Review: The Great Rift by James Mann

The book follows 4 decades of public service, from Mr.  Powel’s service in Vietnam and Mr. Cheney’s entrance to government, to the administration of George W. Bush (43). The two men became great friends, but fell apart in later years.

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Book Review: Agent Jack: The True Story of MI5’s Secret Nazi Hunter by Robert Hutton

Book Review: Agent Jack: The True Story of MI5’s Secret Nazi Hunter by Robert Hutton

The book is expertly researched with extensive notes and bibliographical information. There are many photos and illustrations throughout as well as a list of characters to make it easier to follow.

Book Review: A Futile and Stupid Gesture by Josh Karp

Book Review: A Futile and Stupid Gesture by Josh Karp

Attempts, and I believe succeeded, to capture the personality and intelligence of Mr. Kenney, even though, it seems, he was not aware of  his own comedic brilliance.

Fun Facts Friday: George Eliot

Fun Facts Friday: George Eliot

Eliot’s scandalous personal life clouded her reputation even after her death. Despite her literary achievements, Eliot was not allowed a memorial stone in Westminster Abbey’s Poets’ Corner. She finally received recognition there in 1980, one hundred years after her death.

Book Review: Fortune’s Child: A Novel of Empress Theodora by James Conroyd Martin

Book Review: Fortune’s Child: A Novel of Empress Theodora by James Conroyd Martin

We follow Theodora through childhood, daughter to window trying to make ends meet. Teenage and adulthood where the beautiful woman finds the bug of acting, but does not shy away from prostitution. She ties her fortunes to an upperclassman who has been given a governorship in Africa, but quickly finds out that meddling in affairs of the state will not earn her any friends.

Book Review: Justice in the West Bank? by Yonah Jeremy Bob

Book Review: Justice in the West Bank? by Yonah Jeremy Bob

I really enjoyed that the author concentrated on several personalities in the system, and their interaction on high-profile cases, some which changed the way the courts worked. It is an eye opening, balanced account in which Israeli and Palestinian lawyers, as well as IDF judges sometime find themselves at odds with the security apparatus.

Fun Facts Friday: Gerhart Hauptmann

Fun Facts Friday: Gerhart Hauptmann

Gerhart Hauptmann’s first novel, The Fool in Christ, Emanuel Quint, was published in 1910. In 1912 he published the fictional book Atlantis which became a Danish silent film.  The novel told of a romance aboard a doomed ocean liner and was coincidentally written one month before the RMS Titanic sank, but released about a year later. Perceived as insensitive, the film was banned in Norway.

Book Review: Chasing the Moon by Robert Stone and Alan Andres

Book Review: Chasing the Moon by Robert Stone and Alan Andres

The book mainly fills in the blanks in the non-technical side of the moon landing, the political environment which fostered at the time, as well as how leaders at high levels encouraged or derailed the program based on their own goals and/or selfish reasons.

Book Review: An American Spy by Olen Steinhauer

Book Review: An American Spy by Olen Steinhauer

Mr. Steinhauer refuses to make this novel easy for his readers, but the relish in which he writes, creating a world full of paranoia is worth the effort.

Fun Facts Friday: Bram Stoker

Fun Facts Friday: Bram Stoker

As a member of the London Library, Mr. Stoker has access to research for Dracula. In 2018 the library discovered the books he used for research, along with notes.

Book Review: Dark Territory by Fred Kaplan

Book Review: Dark Territory by Fred Kaplan

Some fascinating stories and anecdotes are included in this book, such as the time President Ronald Reagan saw the movie War Games and asked the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff if it would be possible for a teenager to execute an attack.

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