Fun Facts Friday: John Tenniel

Tenniel was honored as a living national treasure and for his public service was knighted in 1893 by Queen Victoria, the first cartoonist or illustrator to receive the honor.

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Book Review: Wolf by Herbert J. Stern and Alan A. Winter

Through Friedrich we are witnessing one of the ugliest events of the 20th century, from the front seat. Friedrich is privy to many meetings and has a personal insight into Hitler’s taking over Germany

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Book Review: Eat Sleep Work Repeat by Bruce Daisley

In Eat Sleep Work Repeat: 30 Hacks for Bringing Joy to Your Job by Bruce Daisley the author does not only concentrate on cultural changes which, let’s face it, most of us are not in a position to implement, but also on little changes you can make to make your work life more manageable.

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Book Review: All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque does not glamorize war, it is not a battle zone fantasy a-la 80s Hollywood action flicks. It is a sad and sober reflection on the toll war takes on individual soldiers, their families, society, and country. In fact, the Nazis hated this book so much, and the movie, that they banned it altogether.

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Fun Facts Friday: R.P. Blackmur

His literary reputation was not only based on criticism, but also on the poetry Mr. Blackmur wrote.

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Guest Post: Contests and Awards by Chris Harold Stevenson

How much does talent have to do with copping a win? Fortunately a great book will stand out whether it is picked by a panel of judges or a reader’s poll. It is subjective and a matter of personalized opinion. Yet the wheat will win over the chaff. Every time. 

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Book Review: The Blue Zones Kitchen by Dan Buettner

The photographs are gorgeous and the write ups are very interesting. It is important to note that the diet of Blue Zone residents is only part of the reason for thier longevity, climate, reasonable amount of exercise, family, work, and relationships all have a big say in getting to old age

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Book Review: The Fire and the Darkness by Sinclair McKay

The author does not shy away from the controversy surrounding the bombing. Was it necessary? Was it a war crime? A crime against humanity? How did the people who ordered the bombing as well as those executing the orders deal with the morality of it?

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Book Review: Colonel Sun by Robert Markham

Book Review: Colonel Sun by Robert Markham

About: Colonel Sun by Robert Markham is the first novel featuring secret agent James Bond, 007, not written by Ian Fleming. Robert Markham is actually the pseudonym of Kingsley Amis, the book was published six years after the death of Ian Fleming. Paperback: 196 pages Publisher: Bantam; paperback My rating for Colonel Sun– 3 Buy Colonel Sun from Amazon.com* […]

Graphic Novel Review: Batwoman Volume 6: The Unknowns by Marc Andreyko

Graphic Novel Review: Batwoman Volume 6: The Unknowns by Marc Andreyko

The Unknowns are a strange team up, which frankly I enjoyed. Clayface was my new favorite, and The Demon Etrigan is always fun to read. I don’t believe that Batwoman needed a team though, I enjoyed it much more when she was played off as being on the fringes of the Bat family, working alongside them but not with them.

Fun Facts Friday: Dylan Thomas

Fun Facts Friday: Dylan Thomas

Dylan Thomas (27 October, 1914 – 9 November, 1953) was a Welsh writer who is mainly known as a poet, including the famous “Do not go gentle into that good night”. Books by Dylan Thomas* 1)      Born in Swansea, Wales as Dylan Marlais Thomas, he was an average student until the age of 16, when he […]

Book Review: The Lies About Money by Ric Edelman

Book Review: The Lies About Money by Ric Edelman

I’m not trying to be a financial professional by any means, but I’m just hoping to educate myself on the subject enough to either make informed decisions, or enough to ask the right questions when opportunities present themselves.

Book Review: Macbeth by Jo Nesbø

Book Review: Macbeth by Jo Nesbø

This is a dark, violent, grimy and foggy tale, a noir tale of madness which only gets more and more paranoid as the story evolves.

Graphic Novel Review: James Bond: Black Box by Benjamin Percy

Graphic Novel Review: James Bond: Black Box by Benjamin Percy

James Bond: Black Box by Benjamin Percy (art by Rapha Lobosco) is a solid entry into Dynamite’s Bond library even though the plot is weak and predictable, but well written

Fun Facts Friday: Art Buchwald

Fun Facts Friday: Art Buchwald

Art Buchwald (20 October, 1925 – 17 January, 2007) was an American writer best known for his humorist column in the Washington Post, which was syndicated in many other newspapers and a published more than 30 books. Books by Art Buchwald* 1)      Mr. Buchwald was born in New York City and had a pretty rough childhood. […]

Giveaway & Book Review: The Vineyard by María Dueñas

Giveaway & Book Review: The Vineyard by María Dueñas

This book is long, but it’s a satisfying read – something which I rarely say about translated books

Graphic Novel Review: Batwoman Vol. 1: The Many Arms of Death (Rebirth) by Marguerite Bennett and James IV Tynion

Graphic Novel Review: Batwoman Vol. 1: The Many Arms of Death (Rebirth) by Marguerite Bennett and James IV Tynion

I believe that the Kate Kane Batwoman will become one of DC Comics most successful new characters

Book Review: Number One Observatory Circle: The Home of the Vice President of the United States by Charles Denyer

Book Review: Number One Observatory Circle: The Home of the Vice President of the United States by Charles Denyer

The book did not disappoint, not only is it beautiful on the outside, the enclosed photographs of the house, grounds, intimate moments of Vice-Presidents and Presidents with the loved ones, staff, and stuff are alone worth getting the book.

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