Book Review: War’s Edge by Ryan Aslesen

The author just didn’t write a shoot’em up space western, he really put a lot of effort into trying to weave into the story to politics of this futuristic world.

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Fun Facts Friday: G.K. Chesterton

G.K. Chesterton (29 May, 1874 – 14 June, 1936) was an English writer, theologian, critic, and philosopher. Mr. Chesterton’s most famous creating is the priest-detective Father Brown. Books by G.K. Chesterton* He was born as Gilbert Keith Chesterton in Campden Hill, Kensington, an affluent district of London, England. Mr. Chesterton was educated at St. Paul’s, […]

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Book Review: No hesitation by Kirk Russell

The acts might or might not be proper, as our minds cannot follow the AI’s logic or how it attempts to foresee the future. The two programmers in the story act as a collective conscious of creators who regret their creation, that is out of the control

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Book Review: Exit Strategy by Martha Wells

Book 4 of 4 of The Murderbot Diaries tells of the humanization of Murderbot, a weaponized cyborg that became self-aware, one stop forward by making him… care about Dr. Mensah, who is in grave danger. But is Dr. Mensah his owner or friend?

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Fun Facts Friday: Arthur Conan Doyle

Arthur Conan Doyle ((22 May, 1859 – 7 July, 1930) was a Scottish author most famous for creating the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes.

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Book Review: The Greatest Beer Run Ever by John “Chickie” Donohue and J. T. Molloy

If this story wasn’t true it would have been unbelievable, falling squarely under the category of “if I knew what I was doing I wouldn’t do it”, a category which I am also, proudly or not, a member of.

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Guest Post: 7 Great Ways To Write Dialogue

Want to make sure that your characters’ dialogues make sense in your story? Are you receiving feedback saying that the dialogue is either awkward or unrealistic? Well, you’re not alone. All writers want to make dialogue more realistic and believable. With countless books and websites on writing fiction, chances are you’ll come across a section […]

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Book Review: Rogue Protocol by Martha Wells

While this book could be a standalone, I would highly recommend reading the first two. This novella would make a lot more sense, and would be much more enjoyable instead of reading it as a standalone book.

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Graphic Novel Review: Batman: Detective Comics Vol. 2: The Victim Syndicate (Rebirth) by James Tynion IV

Graphic Novel Review: Batman: Detective Comics Vol. 2: The Victim Syndicate (Rebirth) by James Tynion IV

About: Batman: Detective Comics Vol. 2: The Victim Syndicate (Rebirth) by James Tynion IV (illustrated by Eddy Barrows and Alvaro Martinez) sees the innocent victims maimed by Batman’s enemies band together to blame the hero for their misfortune. This graphic novel collected the issues of Detective Comics #943-949. 168 pages Publisher: DC Comics (May 16, 2017) […]

Fun Facts Friday: Ayn Rand

Fun Facts Friday: Ayn Rand

Ayn Rand (2 February, 1905 – 6 March, 1982) was a Russian-American author best known for her novels The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged. | Books by Ayn Rand* 1)      She was born Alisa Zinov’yevna Rosenbaum on February 2nd, 1905, in Saint Petersburg in the Russian Empire. 2)      The author’s family fled to Crimea during the Russian Revolution. […]

Book Review: The Last Days of Oscar Wilde by John Vanderslice

Book Review: The Last Days of Oscar Wilde by John Vanderslice

The whole book Mr. Wilde searching for inner peace. No matter where he goes, what he tries, and who he meets, this search is front and center during the narrative.

Book Review: Sadness is a White Bird by Moriel Rothman-Zecher

Book Review: Sadness is a White Bird by Moriel Rothman-Zecher

Jonathan is an American Jew who decided to serve in the Israeli Defense Forces, only to find himself in jail. Jonathan is friends with two Palestinians, Nimreen and Laith, a brother and sister, he met while living in the United States.

Book Review: Hard Dog to Kill by Craig Holt

Book Review: Hard Dog to Kill by Craig Holt

Stan Mullens, together with his partner Frank Giordano, is an American mercenary who sees himself as a scholar/soldier who likes what he does but has philosophical issues with his job.

Book Review: Anatomy of a Genocide by Omer Bartov

Book Review: Anatomy of a Genocide by Omer Bartov

About: Anatomy of a Genocide: The Life and Death of a Town Called Buczacz by Omer Bartov tells of the violent history in a small Polish town during World War II, when people who lived side by side their whole lives turned on one another. Mr. Bartov is an Israeli scholars who went off to […]

Fun Facts Friday: Mary Mapes Dodge

Fun Facts Friday: Mary Mapes Dodge

As an editor for St. Nicholas Magazine, Mrs. Mapes was in charge of it becoming one of the most successful children magazines in the late 1800s. She was able to get Robert Louis Stephenson, Mark Twain, Louisa May Alcott, among others to contribute.

Graphic Novel Review: Batman: Detective Comics Volume 1: Rise of the Batmen by James Tynion, IV

Graphic Novel Review: Batman: Detective Comics Volume 1: Rise of the Batmen by James Tynion, IV

This is truly a cast book. The “Batmen” are just as interesting as the main hero himself, actually they are more interesting. It is refreshing to read a book where the heroes are just as interesting as the villains.

Book Review: The Cowboy President: The Making of Teddy Roosevelt and the Making of the American West by Michael F. Blake

Book Review: The Cowboy President: The Making of Teddy Roosevelt and the Making of the American West by Michael F. Blake

The author states that this part of Roosevelt’s life is often glossed over by biographers and historians, they don’t see it as very important. As well all know, however, it is the small moments, the unassuming ones which catch us off guard that sometimes create the deepest impact

Fun Facts Friday: Alexander Woollcott

Fun Facts Friday: Alexander Woollcott

Alexander Woollcott (19 January, 1887 – 23 January, 1943) was a critic and commentator, as well as a member of the Algonquin Round Table.  The Algonquin Round Table was a group of writers and actors from New York City which met for lunch at the Algonquin Hotel from 1919 until 1929 or so and inspired each […]

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