Book Review: Unspeakable by Dilys Rose

“The preachers who were the poor boy’s murderers crowded round him at the gallows, and… insulted heaven with prayers more blasphemous than anything he had uttered.”
– Sir Thomas James Babington Macaulay, Baron of Rothley

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Guest Post: Writing A Book And Everything You Need To Know

Writing A Book And Everything You Need To Know Is it true that everyone has a book inside them, waiting to be written? Perhaps not, but you may well think you have a great idea for a story, how to guide, or memoir, just begging to be put down on paper. However, writing is book […]

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Book Review: All Those Things We Never Said by Marc Levy

Frankly, I thought this book could have simply been a short story or a novella

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Fun Facts Friday: Enid Blyton

Trained as a teacher, she wrote in her spare time. Ms. Blyton’s first published book was Child Whispers (1922), while she was still teaching.

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Book Review: The Trick by Emanuel Bergmann

The story actually has three protagonists, Max Cohn, a kid in present day Los Angeles, Moshe Goldenhirsch who is a young Jewish man at the heyday of World War II, and again, Moshe as an elderly retiree in present day Los Angeles

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Book Review: Monticello: The Official Guide to Thomas Jefferson’s World by Charley Miller & Peter Miller

We like visiting historic places and we know that many times context is everything. An artifact, a building, or even something that might seem insignificant get a whole new meaning when viewed in the right light.

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Fun Facts Friday: Knut Hamsun

Knut Hamsun (4 August, 1859 – 19 February, 1952) was a Norwegian author and a Noble prize winner. Books by Knut Hamsun* 1)      Born as Knud Pedersen to a poor family, the author grew up on his uncle’s farm. 2)      When he was nine years old, the boy was separated from his family and went […]

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Book Review: Sons and Soldiers by Bruce Henderson

This is a riveting, easy to read book. Mr. Henderson wrote a wonderful and important book, packed with history and stories which pack an emotional punch.

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Book Review: War Reporting for Cowards by Chris Ayres

Book Review: War Reporting for Cowards by Chris Ayres

Being embedded with American troops is no joke, as he soon finds out

Fun Facts Friday: Richard Adams

Fun Facts Friday: Richard Adams

Richard Adams (9 May, 1920 – 24 December, 2016) was a novelist from England who is known for his novel Watership Down. Books by Richard Adams* 1)      Mr. Adams studied modern history in Worcester College, Oxford. 2)      During World War II he was posted to the Royal Army Service Corps. 3)      Mr. Adams was a […]

Giveaway & Book Review: More Than a Soldier: One Army Ranger’s Daring Escape From the Nazis​ by D.M. Annechino

Giveaway & Book Review: More Than a Soldier: One Army Ranger’s Daring Escape From the Nazis​ by D.M. Annechino

The story takes place during World War II, but the war is just a backdrop to this admirable, and well written, story.

Graphic Novel Review: Hawkeye, Vol. 1: My Life as a Weapon by Matt Fraction, David Aja (Illustrator), Javier Pulido (Illustrator)

Graphic Novel Review: Hawkeye, Vol. 1: My Life as a Weapon by Matt Fraction, David Aja (Illustrator), Javier Pulido (Illustrator)

Clint is finding out what most of us already know – normal life is hard.

Fun Facts Friday: Thomas Hardy

Fun Facts Friday: Thomas Hardy

Thomas Hardy (2 June, 1840 – 11 January, 1928) was an English poet and novelist. Mr. Hardy is considered a Victorian realist. Books by Thomas Hardy* 1)       Mr. Hardy’s novels were very critical of Victorian society, especially on the way rural British people were treated. 2)      William Wordsworth, a well-known English Romantic poet that helped […]

Book Review: Karolina’s Twins by Ronald H. Balson

Book Review: Karolina’s Twins by Ronald H. Balson

The story, the author tells us, is loosely based on tale he heard from a Holocaust survivor he met while working on his previous book while doing research across Europe and at Yad-Vashem, the Israeli Holocaust Museum.

Giveaway (Over): The View from the Cheap Seats by Neil Gaiman

Giveaway (Over): The View from the Cheap Seats by Neil Gaiman

Last week I reviewed The View from the Cheap seats: Selected Nonfiction by Neil Gaiman, a compilation of essays on many subjects the author composed. I enjoyed the book very much and the publisher was kind enough to allow one copy for a giveaway. Please fill out the Rafflecopter form below. Give­away Give­away ends: June 06, 2017 Winners […]

Fun Facts Friday: The Man with the Golden Gun

Fun Facts Friday: The Man with the Golden Gun

A few days ago I reviewed The Man with the Golden Gun by Ian Fleming. It was not my favorite Bond novel (or film), but reading it was still a lot of fun – and isn’t that what it’s all about? For this post I researched the novel, and movie, a bit for a few […]

Book Review: The View from the Cheap Seats by Neil Gaiman

Book Review: The View from the Cheap Seats by Neil Gaiman

I mostly enjoyed the speeches included in this collection. I don’t know if these are the speeches he wrote or are they were transcribed later on – this is because I can hear him talk in my head and know him to be an excellent writer so it could be that either or. The speeches also seem target to a more specific audience (me?) and hence are personalized more than simply talking to the public at large.

Book Review: A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman

Book Review: A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman

This is a clever book and the translation is simply brilliant

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