Book Review: The Labyrinth of the Spirits by Carlos Ruiz Zafón

I absolutely loved the previous three books in the Cemetery of Forgotten Books series: The Shadow of the Wind, The Angel’s Game, and The Prisoner of Heaven. Of course I had to read The Labyrinth of the Spirits by Carlos Ruiz Zafón and hoped to find a satisfying end to one of the finest series of books I’ve ever read.

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Graphic Novel Review: Superman Vol. 3: Multiplicity by Peter J. Tomasi and Patrick Gleason

A graphic novel featuring alternate version of Superman that have been disappearing

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Fun Facts Friday: A.A. Milne

Today is the birthday of British children’s author A.A. Milne (18 January, 1882 – 31 January, 1956). Most people know his most beloved creation Winnie the Pooh. The A.A. stands for Alan Alexander Winnie the Pooh and friends are based on stuffed animals that belonged to Millen’s son – Christopher Robin. You can see the […]

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Guest Post: The 7 Biggest Challenges for Writers and How to Overcome Them

Regardless of your area of expertise, you will agree that writing is one of the most popular and sought-after professions. While being a writer can be lucrative and gives you new opportunities, young writers are still facing a lot of challenges on a daily basis. Sometimes, these obstacles can make or break a writer’s career. […]

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Book Review: The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen

About: The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen is a Pulitzer Prize winning historical fiction book taking place in 197, Viet Nam of a man who, after finishing college in the US, goes back to Vietnam to fight the communists. This is Mr. Nguyen first novel and it won a Pulitzer, where do you go from […]

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Graphic Novel Review: Superman, Volume 2: Trial of the Super Sons by Peter J. Tomasi and Patrick Gleason

A a more naïve, less powerful version of Superman joined with a less moralistic more sarcastic version of Batman is a winning formula.

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Fun Facts Friday: Bernard DeVoto

Bernard DeVoto (11 January, 1897 – 13 November, 19550 was an American writer, historian, editor, and teacher. As well as a writer, Mr. DeVoto is remembered as a champion of public land conversation and civil liberties. Books by Bernard DeVoto* Mr. DeVoto was born in Ogden, Utah. Mr. DeVoto attended the University of Utah for […]

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Book Review: Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman

About: Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman is a retelling of the stories which captivated many over centuries. Mr. Gaiman is a prolific author – and one of my personal favorites. 304 pages Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company Language: English ISBN-10: 039360909X   My rating for Norse Mythology– 3 Buy Norse Mythology from Amazon.com* More […]

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Book Review: Karolina’s Twins by Ronald H. Balson

Book Review: Karolina’s Twins by Ronald H. Balson

The story, the author tells us, is loosely based on tale he heard from a Holocaust survivor he met while working on his previous book while doing research across Europe and at Yad-Vashem, the Israeli Holocaust Museum.

Giveaway (Over): The View from the Cheap Seats by Neil Gaiman

Giveaway (Over): The View from the Cheap Seats by Neil Gaiman

Last week I reviewed The View from the Cheap seats: Selected Nonfiction by Neil Gaiman, a compilation of essays on many subjects the author composed. I enjoyed the book very much and the publisher was kind enough to allow one copy for a giveaway. Please fill out the Rafflecopter form below. Give­away Give­away ends: June 06, 2017 Winners […]

Fun Facts Friday: The Man with the Golden Gun

Fun Facts Friday: The Man with the Golden Gun

A few days ago I reviewed The Man with the Golden Gun by Ian Fleming. It was not my favorite Bond novel (or film), but reading it was still a lot of fun – and isn’t that what it’s all about? For this post I researched the novel, and movie, a bit for a few […]

Book Review: The View from the Cheap Seats by Neil Gaiman

Book Review: The View from the Cheap Seats by Neil Gaiman

I mostly enjoyed the speeches included in this collection. I don’t know if these are the speeches he wrote or are they were transcribed later on – this is because I can hear him talk in my head and know him to be an excellent writer so it could be that either or. The speeches also seem target to a more specific audience (me?) and hence are personalized more than simply talking to the public at large.

Book Review: A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman

Book Review: A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman

This is a clever book and the translation is simply brilliant

Book Review: The Man with the Golden Gun by Ian Fleming

Book Review: The Man with the Golden Gun by Ian Fleming

The novel is not unreadable, it is enjoyable for the Bond fans, but it is far from being one of the best in the series

Fun Facts Friday: Paul Erdman

Fun Facts Friday: Paul Erdman

Paul Erdman (19 May, 1932 – 23 April, 2007) was a financial and business writer. He was known for writing novels based on historical facts and complex financial intrigues. Books by Paul Erdman* 1)      The author earned a PhD in economics and was a former Lutheran seminarian. 2)      He was the first American to establish […]

Book Review: Hook’s Tale John Pielmeier

Book Review: Hook’s Tale John Pielmeier

To enjoy this book, it’s good to be familiar with the character of Hook from the original play

Book Review: Pumpkinflowers by Matti Friedman

Book Review: Pumpkinflowers by Matti Friedman

This is an important book, but as far as I know, no history has yet been written and this personal memoir, an intense eyewitness, will be an important first hand source

Fun Facts Friday: Peter Benchley

Fun Facts Friday: Peter Benchley

The Doubleday editor who met with the author didn’t care for his idea of a non-fiction book about pirates, but loved the man eating shark terrorizing a community pitch. It is said that Mr. Benchley wrote a page in the Doubleday offices and immediately got an advance check.