Book Review: Anxious People by Fredrik Backman

In a small Swedish town, a bank robbery has taken place. The bank robber is, obviously, not a professional for trying to rob a cashless bank. The robber stumbles into a showing for an apartment, on New Year’s Eve no less, and accidentally turns the incident into a hostage situation.

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Fun Facts Friday: Dr. Samuel Johnson

Dr. Samuel Johnson (18 September, 1709 – 12 December, 1784) was an English write, poet and essayist who has made large contributions to English literature.

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Book Review: A Lion in the Grass by Mark Zvonkovic

This was a surprising book, unlike many of the espionage novels I’ve read before. The story takes place over 70+ years in which the protagonist finds himself on the edge of history, like many of us do.

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Book Review: A Quiet Madness: A biographical novel of Edgar Allan Poe by John Isaac Jones

I don’t know much about Poe’s life, besides the bullet points many people are familiar with. I thought the author did a good job re imagining his life, habits, and most of all motivations. I especially enjoyed the chapter in which Poe wrote his most famous poem “The Raven” and how it came to be.

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Fun Facts Friday: O. Henry

O. Henry (11 September, 1862 – 5 June, 1910) was an American writer, known for his short stories.

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Book Review: Comrade Koba by Robert Littell

It is unclear what role Koba plays in Stalin’s government, except that he is a very high, and admired advisor. Koba, like Stalin, also came from Georgia and, like Stalin, excuses the crimes which the regime commits as a path to a greater “worker’s paradise”. It is a very interesting exercise to explain such concepts to an audience, especially if they’re ten year olds. Koba, at points, seem to be trying to convince himself of the deeds he is a part of, instead of convincing Leon

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Book Review: Stan Lee: A Life in Comics by Liel Leibovitz

This is a short biography on one of the most influential men in American pop-culture, and a true American success story. The book tries to tie Stan Lee’s stories and ideas to Jewish culture and Jewish religious book, some of the passages are a stretch, but all of them are interesting and show an understanding of the author of the characters he created.

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Fun Facts Friday: François-Auguste-René, vicomte de Chateaubriand

François-Auguste-René, vicomte de Chateaubriand (4 September, 1768 – 4 July, 1848) was a French author and diplomat, known as one of the first Romantic writes of his country.

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Giveaway: Hawthorn Woods By Patrick Canning

Giveaway: Hawthorn Woods By Patrick Canning

The publisher is giving away one (1) copy of this book – enter via the rafflecoper form at the end of the post Hawthorn Woods By Patrick Canning NEW DOMESTIC THRILLER DIVES INTO THE DARK SIDE OF THE SUBURBS: EVEN PRETTY LITTLE TOWNS CAN HAVE BIG UGLY SECRETS   Not all small towns are as […]

Book Review: We Germans by Alexander Starritt

Book Review: We Germans by Alexander Starritt

The grandfather, Meissner, and his exhausted companions are living a nightmare for two and a half years. Somehow barely surviving, committing war crimes and treason as they make their way back home in order to live another day

Book Review: The Books of Rachel by Joel Gross

Book Review: The Books of Rachel by Joel Gross

If all you know of Jewish history is the Bible or your World War II classes in school, this book attempts to fill in some of the gaps.

Fun Facts Friday: Primo Levi

Fun Facts Friday: Primo Levi

Primo Levi (31 July, 1919 – 11 April, 1987) was an Italian chemist and writer books about his experiences as a Jewish man during World War II.

Book Review: Disney’s Land by Richard Snow

Book Review: Disney’s Land by Richard Snow

Walt Disney’s attention to detail is amazing, but like many great men this part of his personality caused great concern and setbacks when it came to the park. He insisted on details being absolutely right even though no one but him and the workers will see it. Whether he was right or not depends on who you ask, personally I’m amazed at the details in the parks and could enjoy simply walking around appreciating them all without ever going on an actual ride.

Book Review: The Exiles by Christina Baker Kline

Book Review: The Exiles by Christina Baker Kline

The book was well researched and Ms. Kline brought forth historical accuracies without taking away from the narrative, something many historical fiction authors fail to do.  

Fun Facts Friday: Zelda Fitzgerald

Fun Facts Friday: Zelda Fitzgerald

Zelda Fitzgerald (24 July, 1900 – 10 March, 1948) was an American author, painter and socialite. Together with her husband, F. Scott Fitzgerald, they became the symbol for the Roaring 20s.

Guest Post: What You Need to Know About the Art of Fanfiction

Guest Post: What You Need to Know About the Art of Fanfiction

While fanfiction may make you think of “50 Shades of Grey” or teen fiction brought about in the internet age, fanfiction actually has a rich root in history.

Book Review: Champion: A German Boxer, a Jewish Assassin and Hitler’s Revenge by Stephen Deutsch

Book Review: Champion: A German Boxer, a Jewish Assassin and Hitler’s Revenge by Stephen Deutsch

The book is well researched, it presents events with historical accuracy without spending time on nuances which will bog down the story. I enjoyed that the author tried to make the story flow presenting relevant facts intertwining with the narrative.

Book Review: In the Shadows of Men by Robert Jackson Bennett

Book Review: In the Shadows of Men by Robert Jackson Bennett

When I was about half way in the novella, I didn’t know if I was reading a supernatural story, or one about a man’s sanity spiraling down to oblivion. It turned out that this story is a bit of both, exploring the traumas of childhood and how it affects adults’ lives.

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