Book Review: Chasing the Moon by Robert Stone and Alan Andres

The book mainly fills in the blanks in the non-technical side of the moon landing, the political environment which fostered at the time, as well as how leaders at high levels encouraged or derailed the program based on their own goals and/or selfish reasons.

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Book Review: An American Spy by Olen Steinhauer

Mr. Steinhauer refuses to make this novel easy for his readers, but the relish in which he writes, creating a world full of paranoia is worth the effort.

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Fun Facts Friday: Bram Stoker

As a member of the London Library, Mr. Stoker has access to research for Dracula. In 2018 the library discovered the books he used for research, along with notes.

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Book Review: Dark Territory by Fred Kaplan

Some fascinating stories and anecdotes are included in this book, such as the time President Ronald Reagan saw the movie War Games and asked the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff if it would be possible for a teenager to execute an attack.

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Book Review: Return to the Reich by Eric Lichtblau

Mr. Mayer must have had balls of steel, he seem to have neve inherited the protective gene of fear. Whether it is to fly a B24 without training, or jump out of it over the Austrian Alps – for the first time.

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Fun Facts: Sholem Asch

The drama 1906 God of Vengeance (Got fun nekome) takes place in a Jewish brothel and includes Jewish prostitutes, lesbians, and throwing of the Torah across the stage. The play was translated into about a dozen languages and was very controversial. It was hailed as artistic and beautiful but also as immoral and misrepresenting Jewish traditions.

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Book Review: A Matter of Interpretation by Elizabeth Mac Donald

I was impressed by the research the author has done, rich historical details lend authenticity to the story, even when the paranormal is provoked (not very often, but just right). The narrative remains plausible and the characters seem true to their historical counterparts.

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Book Review: Information Wars by Richard Stengel

Mr. Stengel makes an excellent case about the first part of his subtitle, but sadly the second part “what can we do about it” is not convincing. Mostly because of the government bureaucracies, slow moving administrative machinery, and simply the way democracies work.

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Book Review: During-the-Event by Roger Wall

Book Review: During-the-Event by Roger Wall

I appreciated the way the author set up the post-apocalyptic world, from the beginning. The reader immediately understands the impact climate change had had on the country, the people, and the world. D.E. tells the story he was told by his grandfather, even though he was too young to remember those life changing events.

Fun Facts Friday: Louis Auchincloss

Fun Facts Friday: Louis Auchincloss

Louis Auchincloss (27 September, 1917 – 26 January, 2010) was a novelist, historian, and essayist from New York

Book Review: Quichotte by Salman Rushdie

Book Review: Quichotte by Salman Rushdie

Just as Cervantes made fun of the junk-culture in his era, Mr. Rushdie takes the challenge and goes to a literary war with the garbage that Americans are inundated with every minute of every day.

Book Review: The Nearest Exit by Olen Steinhauer

Book Review: The Nearest Exit by Olen Steinhauer

In The Nearest Exit by Olen Steinhauer bats the story out of the park again, with an unbelievable plot involving the CIA, Germany’s secret service as well as a guest appearances by the Ukrainians and Chinese.

Fun Facts Friday: Upton Sinclair

Fun Facts Friday: Upton Sinclair

Upton Sinclair (20 September, 1878 – 25 November, 1968) was an American writer, winner of the Pulitzer Prize, who published books in several genres.

Book Review: Dark Money by Jane Mayer

Book Review: Dark Money by Jane Mayer

The books is written in a simple, unemotional narrative which leads the reader to scratch their heads in amusement, or tear their hair out in anger.

Book Spotlight: Hands Up by Stephen Clark

Book Spotlight: Hands Up by Stephen Clark

Officer Ryan Quinn, a rookie raised in a family of cops, is on the fast track to detective until he shoots an unarmed black male. Now, with his career, reputation and freedom on the line, he embarks on a quest for redemption that forces him to confront his fears and biases and choose between conscience […]

Book Review: The Tourist by Olen Steinhauer

Book Review: The Tourist by Olen Steinhauer

This novel is the full package though, it is compelling, articulate and the struggle of Milo to balance his difficult, secretive, work with the important part of his life, his family, really comes across.

Fun Facts Friday: Alain Locke

Fun Facts Friday: Alain Locke

Born as Alain Leroy Locke in Philadelphia, PA, he was the only child and a decedent of prominent families of free blacks

Guest Post: The Color of Our Sky by Amita Trasi

Guest Post: The Color of Our Sky  by Amita Trasi

Amita Trasi has a two-voice tale, moving from the past to the present and vice versa is dense, emotional, and resonates in you, even when the book has long been read. Modern India, the history of female lawlessness, childish betrayal and its atonement, there is a lot of everything.

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