Book Review: A New Genesis by Shimon Peres

His worldview and predictions for a better world shaped his speeches and willingness to compromise with militants and extremists in his own party, opposing political forces, as well as other countries. To his credit, Mr. Peres is one of the few politicians, worldwide, that even attempts to start a discussion about a “new Middle East”, a very divisive topic.

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Book Review: The Sweetest Fruits by Monique Truong

Instead we get different view points of what made Mr. Hearn’s voice so memorable to his fans, through tales from the women who fell by the wayside, but have had as much an impact on the writer as he had on himself.

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Fun Facts Friday: Captain Frederick Marryat

Captain Frederick Marryat (10 July, 1792 – 9 August, 1848) was a Royal Navy officer, and a novelist who pioneered historical naval fiction.

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Book Review: How to Lose the Information War by Nina Jankowicz

I have to give Ms. Jankowicz credit for not taking sides and attempting to be as bipartisan as possible. She writes about how many entities on the political spectrum in the US embrace Russian disinformation tactics to their advantage.

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Book Review: The Atlantis World by A.G. Riddle

I really enjoyed the overall premise to he series, but in this last book I’m not sure what the author wanted to convey, or if he had a trilogy planned out at all. It seemed like a bunch of story-lines thrown together for good measure, crossing fingers they would somehow work and make sense.

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Fun Facts Friday: M.F.K. Fisher

M.F.K. Fisher (3 July, 1908 – 22 June, 1992) was a food writer and translator. Ms. Fisher believed that eating well was one of the “arts of life”

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Book Review: The Revelators by Ace Atkins

The story revolves around Mexicans getting deported from a chicken plant, in an inhuman way which separates them from their children. Some children were kidnapped by gangs, getting sold to into the sex trade. What that, and several other subplots have to do with Quinn’s assassination attempt you’ll have to read for yourself.

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Book Review: The Atlantis Plague by A. G. Riddle

The second book in The Origin Mystery trilogy, a science-fiction story following a genealogist out to save the human race from the brink of extinction.

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Book Review: The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid: A Memoir by Bill Bryson

Book Review: The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid: A Memoir by Bill Bryson

What gives this book its unique voice is that the memoir is told through the eyes of Mr. Bryson as if he went back in time to his childhood in Des Moines, IA but retained his talent for writing and life experience – yet writing from the perspective of a child with a wink and a nod towards the appreciative audience

Book Review: The Ice Princess by Camilla Läckberg

Book Review: The Ice Princess by Camilla Läckberg

I found the setting of a claustrophobic small fishing town of Fjällbacka to be the most intriguing character.  Läckberg does a masterful job capturing the feel of a small town with lots of bad history to bury, where every ripple causes a big effect in the lives of many people.  The seemingly idyllic town, where rich people flock to buy summer houses for peaceful, restful and pleasant vacations, holds many dark riddles which the townsfolk would rather be left uncovered.

Book Review: The Girl Who Played with Fire by Stieg Larsson

Book Review: The Girl Who Played with Fire by Stieg Larsson

However, this is a fun book; the book can be ridiculous at times and riveting at others. The character of Salander, who was somewhat believable in the first novel is taken to extremes in this one, but is still great fun even though the “chance encounter” plot twist is a bit overplayed.

Book Review: James Monroe by Gary Hart

Book Review: James Monroe by Gary Hart

The book is a good discussion starter about President Monroe, it is by no means a complete biography, but it’s not meant to be either.  The narrow scope of the book is interesting, concise and well written; a welcomed introduction a president many have forgotten.

Beirut 39: New Writing from the Arab World Edited by Samuel Shimon

Beirut 39: New Writing from the Arab World Edited by Samuel Shimon

Disclaimer: I got this book as an Advanced Reader Copy (ARC) for free. “Beirut 39” is a collection of stories and poems, edited by Samuel Shimon.  The collection is the product of a literary competition in the Arab world, young authors and poets, all under 40 years of age, competed in a contest sponsored by, […]

Book Review: Little Bee by Chris Cleave

Book Review: Little Bee by Chris Cleave

I liked Little Bee and the ending caught me a bit by surprise and I liked the distinct voices author Chris Cleave tries to use – it made the story more interesting and gave us a bit of background about Little Bee without having to resort to flashbacks.

Book Review: Eye of the Red Tsar by Sam Eastland

Book Review: Eye of the Red Tsar by Sam Eastland

There is something about the Romanov’s which has always been lighting up people’s imaginations, whether it’s the rumors about their death (helped immensely by misinformation from the Russian government), or the enormous wealth symbolized by the fabulous Faberge eggs or the legends of the survival of Princess Anastasia.
In “Eye of the Red Tsar”, a fictional tale with historical accuracy, author Sam Eastland introduced his audience to the Tsar’s personal detective Inspector Pekkala. We first meet Pekkala in exile at the harsh forests of Sebria, where he works in the gulag as a tree marker.  Pekkala has survied this punishing task for almost a decade, shattering the record for a job that most people last in a few months before dying.

Book Review: The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Michael Chabon

Book Review: The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Michael Chabon

The book touches on many themes, such as the role Jewish writers and artists played in American pop culture (like it or not comics are American mythology). However, escapism is probably the most important theme, whether it is from Nazi occupied Europe or from one of the characters sexual identity or physical weakness.

Book Review: Infamous by Ace Atkins

Book Review: Infamous by Ace Atkins

The story is told through the eyes of an invisible observer, a fly on the wall. We, the readers, do not hear what any of the characters think but we observe them from a close distance.The storytelling is riveting and exciting; the characters are interesting, engaging and dimensional. I don’t know if Mr. Atkins meant to make George Kelly a likable figure, but to me he was the most likeable person in this unique cast of characters.

Book Review: Booth’s Sister by Jane Singer

Book Review: Booth’s Sister by Jane Singer

 From what I understand, author Jane Singer used Asia Booth’s diary as her basis for this book which makes her take on the events following the assassination of President Lincoln unique.

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