Fun Facts Friday: G.K. Chesterton

G.K. Chesterton (29 May, 1874 – 14 June, 1936) was an English writer, theologian, critic, and philosopher. Mr. Chesterton’s most famous creating is the priest-detective Father Brown. Books by G.K. Chesterton* He was born as Gilbert Keith Chesterton in Campden Hill, Kensington, an affluent district of London, England. Mr. Chesterton was educated at St. Paul’s, […]

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Book Review: No hesitation by Kirk Russell

The acts might or might not be proper, as our minds cannot follow the AI’s logic or how it attempts to foresee the future. The two programmers in the story act as a collective conscious of creators who regret their creation, that is out of the control

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Book Review: Exit Strategy by Martha Wells

Book 4 of 4 of The Murderbot Diaries tells of the humanization of Murderbot, a weaponized cyborg that became self-aware, one stop forward by making him… care about Dr. Mensah, who is in grave danger. But is Dr. Mensah his owner or friend?

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Fun Facts Friday: Arthur Conan Doyle

Arthur Conan Doyle ((22 May, 1859 – 7 July, 1930) was a Scottish author most famous for creating the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes.

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Book Review: The Greatest Beer Run Ever by John “Chickie” Donohue and J. T. Molloy

If this story wasn’t true it would have been unbelievable, falling squarely under the category of “if I knew what I was doing I wouldn’t do it”, a category which I am also, proudly or not, a member of.

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Guest Post: 7 Great Ways To Write Dialogue

Want to make sure that your characters’ dialogues make sense in your story? Are you receiving feedback saying that the dialogue is either awkward or unrealistic? Well, you’re not alone. All writers want to make dialogue more realistic and believable. With countless books and websites on writing fiction, chances are you’ll come across a section […]

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Book Review: Rogue Protocol by Martha Wells

While this book could be a standalone, I would highly recommend reading the first two. This novella would make a lot more sense, and would be much more enjoyable instead of reading it as a standalone book.

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Fun Facts Friday: Mikhail Bulgakov

Mikhail Bulgakov (15 May, 1891 – 10 March, 1940) was a Russian writer best known for his novel The Master and Margarita, which was published posthumously.

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Book Review: Delilah by India Edghill

Book Review: Delilah by India Edghill

This attempt at biblical fiction not a re-telling of the story of Samson, but a complete overhaul of the familiar story – a re-imagining if you will. The bible doesn’t tell us much about Samson’s wife, or even Delilah (except that she was beautiful, Samson’s love, of the Valley of Sorek and one heck of a nag), so a lot is left to the imagination.

Book Review: The Most Dangerous Place: Pakistan’s Lawless Frontier by Imtiaz Gul

Book Review: The Most Dangerous Place: Pakistan’s Lawless Frontier by Imtiaz Gul

Mr. Gul is certainly an expert on the subject and breezes through acronyms, even though to his credit he explains who they are / were several times in the narrative – for those who need more information there is a comprehensive synopsis of militants and organizations in the tribal areas of Pakistan.

Book Review: An Inconvenient Elephant: A Novel by Judy Reene Singer

Book Review: An Inconvenient Elephant: A Novel by Judy Reene Singer

This is a charming book; a quick read with likable characters even thought the plot is quite predictable and somewhat unbelievable.

Book Review: The Painted Darkness by Brian James Freeman

Book Review: The Painted Darkness by Brian James Freeman

The story is a very imaginative piece and the marketing is brilliant. Since this isn’t the type of genre I usually read I never would have been introduced to the author Brian James Freeman unless I would have been given this book for free.

Graphic Novel Revew: The Impostor’s Daughter: A True Memoir by Laurie Sandell

Graphic Novel Revew: The Impostor’s Daughter: A True Memoir by Laurie Sandell

I was hooked on the first few pages of the book, the art is wonderful, the story is told through a very personal point of view and the format is engaging

Book Review: Don Quixote – by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Edith Grossman (Translator)

Book Review: Don Quixote – by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Edith Grossman (Translator)

Even though this book was written centuries ago I found it contemporary, charming, hilarious and accessible. I believe that it is a great disservice to Cervantes that Don Quixote is being thought of as a drama only to disregard the story’s comedic aspects.

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