Guest Post: The Marketing Power Of Book Pricing

You’ve written the perfect book, and now you’ve put it out there on Amazon. But how can you be sure that you’re getting the absolute maximum amount of sales that are possible, with the quality of your book, cover and description staying the same?

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Book Review: Frances Mayes Always Italy by Frances Mayes & Ondine Cohane

About: Frances Mayes Always Italy by Frances Mayes & Ondine Cohane is a travel book and guide to the country which they both love. Ms. Mayes is a renowned writer of such books as Under the Tuscan Sun and other bestsellers. Ms. Cohane is a New York Times travel writer. 416 pages Publisher: National Geographic […]

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Fun Facts Friday: George Herbert

George Herbert (3 April, 1593 – 1 March, 1633) was an English priest, orator, and poet. His poems are associated with the writings of metaphysical poets.

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Book Review: Promote Yourself: The New Rules for Career Success by Dan Schawbel

This book has aged, some of the specific advice is no longer relevant, as many are at this age where information moves so fast it changes on a monthly, weekly, daily, and even hourly basis. So it’s only expected that what was true about certain websites five years ago, is no longer so.

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Book Review: The Last Tourist by Olen Steinhauer

Milo Weaver, the reluctant spy, finds himself facing a CIA analyst about 10 years after the Department of Tourism, CIA’s silent assassins, was disbanded. The two find themselves on the run when a new breed of Tourists tries to kill them both.

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Fun Facts Friday: Howard Lindsay

Lindsay and Crouse won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for the play State of the Union (1946).

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Book Review: Captain Nemo by Kevin J. Anderson

This was a really enjoyable story, the narrative reads like a biography and not a fictional tale,

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Guest Post: 4 Books That Will Change Your Life

Words can be powerful. Most readers will know from experience that certain books and their ideas and philosophies have the ability to affect how you see the world. We have collected a handful of books that, regardless of time, age or setting, have a message that will impact your life for the better.

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Book Review: Daughter of the Reich by Louise Fein

Book Review: Daughter of the Reich by Louise Fein

This novel was an easy read, and well researched. Much of the book isn’t historical per-say, which is why I don’t know if I’d categorize it as historical-fiction, but rather as a novel which takes place in the past.

Book Review: The Lost Book of Adana Moreau by Michael Zapata

Book Review: The Lost Book of Adana Moreau by Michael Zapata

The author builds the story in multiple layers, orphans, diaspora, multiple Earths, and more importantly the way past generations influence future ones in ways which they never imagined.

Fun Facts Friday: L. Ron Hubbard

Fun Facts Friday: L. Ron Hubbard

Mr. Hubbard wrote in many genres, fiction, travel, mysteries, westerns and even aviation.

Book Review: Heart of Junk by Luke Geddes

Book Review: Heart of Junk by Luke Geddes

This was a fun, original novel. It’s not meant to be taken seriously and the author embraces each character’s person, quirks, and stereotype.

Book Review: A Single Swallow by Ling Zhang

Book Review: A Single Swallow by Ling Zhang

The first chapter or two got me interested in the concept, ghosts meeting up in a per-scheduled date and time, even though they had to wait a few decades for the meeting to cumulate fully. The narrative got slower than, but the rich language kept me going and once Ah Yan got introduced the whole story took off.

Fun Facts Friday: Cyrano de Bergerac

Fun Facts Friday: Cyrano de Bergerac

When he was 19 years old, de Bergerac enlisted a corps of the guards from 1639 to 1640. Since he was an officer and a nobleman, even a though a minor one, he was known for boasting and dueling.

Book Spotlight: The Hidden Key by David E. Grogan

Book Spotlight: The Hidden Key by David E. Grogan

When Navy veteran Kevin Jones answers the door for two men he doesn’t know, he can’t foresee the Pandora’s Box he’s opening. One week later, attorney Steve Stilwell meets with a billionaire businessman in a London eatery. As two men burst into the restaurant, Steve’s new client cries out “I’ve sold my soul.” Moments later he is dead, leaving Steve to figure out why.

Book Review: 100 Drives, 5,000 Ideas (2020 Edition) by Joe Yogerst

Book Review: 100 Drives, 5,000 Ideas (2020 Edition) by Joe Yogerst

100 Drives, 5,000 Ideas: Where to Go, When to Go, What to Do, What to See by Joe Yogerst gives the reader excellent ideas of where to go and what to do within their geographical area (for our family, we figure about 100 miles one way, for a day trip). The book also has great tips for those who like to do more than to drive, but bike, camp, hike, etc.

Guest Post: Edgar Allan Poe: The Fall of the House of Usher Examined by Ren Zelen

Guest Post: Edgar Allan Poe: The Fall of the House of Usher Examined by Ren Zelen

Central to this story is that fact that Roderick and the Lady Madeline are twins, this suggests that when he buries her, he hopes that death will somehow separate them. However, this act of division between the living and the dead merely culminates in the Fall of the House of Usher. When Roderick tries to rid himself of his twin half, he is, in effect, signing his own death warrant. 

Fun Facts Friday: John Tenniel

Fun Facts Friday: John Tenniel

Tenniel was honored as a living national treasure and for his public service was knighted in 1893 by Queen Victoria, the first cartoonist or illustrator to receive the honor.

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