Book Review: Eat Sleep Work Repeat by Bruce Daisley

In Eat Sleep Work Repeat: 30 Hacks for Bringing Joy to Your Job by Bruce Daisley the author does not only concentrate on cultural changes which, let’s face it, most of us are not in a position to implement, but also on little changes you can make to make your work life more manageable.

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Book Review: All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque does not glamorize war, it is not a battle zone fantasy a-la 80s Hollywood action flicks. It is a sad and sober reflection on the toll war takes on individual soldiers, their families, society, and country. In fact, the Nazis hated this book so much, and the movie, that they banned it altogether.

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Fun Facts Friday: R.P. Blackmur

His literary reputation was not only based on criticism, but also on the poetry Mr. Blackmur wrote.

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Guest Post: Contests and Awards by Chris Harold Stevenson

How much does talent have to do with copping a win? Fortunately a great book will stand out whether it is picked by a panel of judges or a reader’s poll. It is subjective and a matter of personalized opinion. Yet the wheat will win over the chaff. Every time. 

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Book Review: The Blue Zones Kitchen by Dan Buettner

The photographs are gorgeous and the write ups are very interesting. It is important to note that the diet of Blue Zone residents is only part of the reason for thier longevity, climate, reasonable amount of exercise, family, work, and relationships all have a big say in getting to old age

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Book Review: The Fire and the Darkness by Sinclair McKay

The author does not shy away from the controversy surrounding the bombing. Was it necessary? Was it a war crime? A crime against humanity? How did the people who ordered the bombing as well as those executing the orders deal with the morality of it?

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Guest Post: 5 True Ray Bradbury’s Predictions about the Future Technologies

Ray Bradbury is one of the science fiction pioneers who cleverly envisaged a brand new world and its reliance on cutting-edge technologies. In his famous dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451 – published way back in 1953 – Bradbury predicted a wide range of high-tech phenomena that turned out to be true a few decades later. A […]

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Book Review: The Great Rift by James Mann

The book follows 4 decades of public service, from Mr.  Powel’s service in Vietnam and Mr. Cheney’s entrance to government, to the administration of George W. Bush (43). The two men became great friends, but fell apart in later years.

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Guest Book Review: My Education by Susan Choi

Guest Book Review: My Education by Susan Choi

This stylish, steamy campus novel dissects a passionate affair between a brainy ingenue and her professor’s magnetic, intellectual, incandescent wife.

Book Review: More Noble Than War by Nicholas Blincoe

Book Review: More Noble Than War by Nicholas Blincoe

I have long ago realized that many things are more than they seem, and that politics seem to be encroaching on every aspect of our life.

Fun Facts Friday: Zane Grey

Fun Facts Friday: Zane Grey

The TV series The Lone Ranger was adapted from his successful novel The Lone Star Ranger (adapted into movies in 1919, 1923, 1930 and 1942, and a 1949 comic book published by Dell Comics titled The Ranger). Fifty of Mr. Grey’s novels were adapted into over 100 movies.

Book Review: The Circus by Jonas Karlsson

Book Review: The Circus by Jonas Karlsson

The unnamed narrator and his friend, Magnus, go to the circus together. They don’t see each other often, but share the bond of outcasts and love of music. During the show, a magician asks for volunteers for his disappearing act. Magnus volunteers and never comes back.

Book Review: Apeirogon by Colum McCann

Book Review: Apeirogon by Colum McCann

Apeirogon by Colum McCann is an extraordinary book, it’s different in narrative and structure, yet poignant and able to make its point.

Fun Facts Friday: William Congreve

Fun Facts Friday: William Congreve

Mr. Congreve went to Kilkenny College meeting Jonathan Swift

Book Review: The Unexpected Spy by Tracy Walder and Jessica Anya Blau

Book Review: The Unexpected Spy by Tracy Walder and Jessica Anya Blau

This memoir by Tracy Walder nee Tracy Schandler tells of her time in the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), which recruited her right out of college. Ms. Schandler worked in counterterrorism after the September 11 terrorist attack on the World Trade Center and the insights she gives about the work her and her fellow patriots did at the CIA before and after.

Book Review: Comanche by Brett Riely

Book Review: Comanche by Brett Riely

There is lots of good banter, sometimes you can’t tell if the character is saying, thinking, or just gesturing (oh, you) but the author gets the feeling across efficiently and quickly which makes the reading much more pleasurable.

Fun Facts Friday: Benjamin Franklin

Fun Facts Friday: Benjamin Franklin

January 17 is the birthday of one of the most famous man in American History, Benjamin Franklin ( 17 January, 1706 – 17 April, 1790). I read Benjamin Franklin’s Biography by Walter Isaacson a few years ago and it is, to this day, a favorite of mine. Many people know that Mr. Franklin was a […]

Book Review: Grunt by Mary Roach

Book Review: Grunt by Mary Roach

About: Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War by Mary Roach is a nonfiction book which tackles subjects that challenge soldiers’ daily life, but are rarely thought about (unless it’s you wearing the uniform).  Ms. Roach, an award winning author, is known for her books which combine science and journalism. 288 pages Publisher: W. […]

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