Book Spotlight: How Fires End by Marco Rafalà

A dark secret born out of World War II lies at the heart of a Sicilian American family in this emotional and sweeping saga of guilt, revenge, and, ultimately, redemption. After soldiers vacate the Sicilian hillside town of Melilli in the summer of 1943, the locals celebrate, giving thanks to their patron saint, Sebastian. Amid […]

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Fun Facts Friday: Heinrich von Kleist

Heinrich von Kleist (18, October 1777 – 21, November 1811) was a poet, novelist, writer and journalist from Germany.

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Book Review: The First Stone by Carsten Jensen

A platoon of Danish soldiers, part of NATO forces, are hampered down in Afghanistan fighting the Taliban. Third platoon has a charismatic and brave leader, Schrøder, who answers to Colonel Steffensen. The two man are polar opposites.

The soldiers embark on a revenge mission, without realizing they are being set up by a traitor from within. Third platoon realizes that in war you have to make inconvenient allies, and embrace strange bedfellows just to survive the day.
If you’re lucky.

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Book Review: The Second World War Illustrated by Jack Holroyd

The book is full of pictures, many of which I have never seen, each one with an engrossing caption.

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Book Review: The Binding by Bridget Collins

I was looking forward to reading more about the “binding”, how it worked, affected people and what is Emmett’s role in the whole magical realm the author created.

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Fun Facts Friday: Elmore Leonard

Elmore Leonard (11 October, 1925 – 20 August, 2013) was an American writer and screenwriter who specialized in thrillers and crime fiction.

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Book Review: The Names Heard Long Ago by Jonathan Wilson

The Names Heard Long Ago: How the Golden Age of Hungarian Soccer Shaped the Modern Game by Jonathan Wilson recounts how the Hungary’s changed soccer and became a powerhouse exporting players and coaches to the world.

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Book Review: The First Wave by Alex Kershaw

I enjoyed this book very much, it is very easy to read and Mr. Kershaw, as usual, goes out of his way to tell big stories in an intimate way. Even though I read numerous books bout D-Day, the individual accounts in this book were refreshing and help me get a better understanding of the success of these groups.

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Book Review: During-the-Event by Roger Wall

Book Review: During-the-Event by Roger Wall

I appreciated the way the author set up the post-apocalyptic world, from the beginning. The reader immediately understands the impact climate change had had on the country, the people, and the world. D.E. tells the story he was told by his grandfather, even though he was too young to remember those life changing events.

Fun Facts Friday: Louis Auchincloss

Fun Facts Friday: Louis Auchincloss

Louis Auchincloss (27 September, 1917 – 26 January, 2010) was a novelist, historian, and essayist from New York

Book Review: Quichotte by Salman Rushdie

Book Review: Quichotte by Salman Rushdie

Just as Cervantes made fun of the junk-culture in his era, Mr. Rushdie takes the challenge and goes to a literary war with the garbage that Americans are inundated with every minute of every day.

Book Review: The Nearest Exit by Olen Steinhauer

Book Review: The Nearest Exit by Olen Steinhauer

In The Nearest Exit by Olen Steinhauer bats the story out of the park again, with an unbelievable plot involving the CIA, Germany’s secret service as well as a guest appearances by the Ukrainians and Chinese.

Fun Facts Friday: Upton Sinclair

Fun Facts Friday: Upton Sinclair

Upton Sinclair (20 September, 1878 – 25 November, 1968) was an American writer, winner of the Pulitzer Prize, who published books in several genres.

Book Review: Dark Money by Jane Mayer

Book Review: Dark Money by Jane Mayer

The books is written in a simple, unemotional narrative which leads the reader to scratch their heads in amusement, or tear their hair out in anger.

Book Spotlight: Hands Up by Stephen Clark

Book Spotlight: Hands Up by Stephen Clark

Officer Ryan Quinn, a rookie raised in a family of cops, is on the fast track to detective until he shoots an unarmed black male. Now, with his career, reputation and freedom on the line, he embarks on a quest for redemption that forces him to confront his fears and biases and choose between conscience […]

Book Review: The Tourist by Olen Steinhauer

Book Review: The Tourist by Olen Steinhauer

This novel is the full package though, it is compelling, articulate and the struggle of Milo to balance his difficult, secretive, work with the important part of his life, his family, really comes across.

Fun Facts Friday: Alain Locke

Fun Facts Friday: Alain Locke

Born as Alain Leroy Locke in Philadelphia, PA, he was the only child and a decedent of prominent families of free blacks

Guest Post: The Color of Our Sky by Amita Trasi

Guest Post: The Color of Our Sky  by Amita Trasi

Amita Trasi has a two-voice tale, moving from the past to the present and vice versa is dense, emotional, and resonates in you, even when the book has long been read. Modern India, the history of female lawlessness, childish betrayal and its atonement, there is a lot of everything.

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