Book Review: Justice in the West Bank? by Yonah Jeremy Bob

I really enjoyed that the author concentrated on several personalities in the system, and their interaction on high-profile cases, some which changed the way the courts worked. It is an eye opening, balanced account in which Israeli and Palestinian lawyers, as well as IDF judges sometime find themselves at odds with the security apparatus.

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Fun Facts Friday: Gerhart Hauptmann

Gerhart Hauptmann’s first novel, The Fool in Christ, Emanuel Quint, was published in 1910. In 1912 he published the fictional book Atlantis which became a Danish silent film.  The novel told of a romance aboard a doomed ocean liner and was coincidentally written one month before the RMS Titanic sank, but released about a year later. Perceived as insensitive, the film was banned in Norway.

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Book Review: Chasing the Moon by Robert Stone and Alan Andres

The book mainly fills in the blanks in the non-technical side of the moon landing, the political environment which fostered at the time, as well as how leaders at high levels encouraged or derailed the program based on their own goals and/or selfish reasons.

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Book Review: An American Spy by Olen Steinhauer

Mr. Steinhauer refuses to make this novel easy for his readers, but the relish in which he writes, creating a world full of paranoia is worth the effort.

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Fun Facts Friday: Bram Stoker

As a member of the London Library, Mr. Stoker has access to research for Dracula. In 2018 the library discovered the books he used for research, along with notes.

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Book Review: Dark Territory by Fred Kaplan

Some fascinating stories and anecdotes are included in this book, such as the time President Ronald Reagan saw the movie War Games and asked the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff if it would be possible for a teenager to execute an attack.

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Book Review: Return to the Reich by Eric Lichtblau

Mr. Mayer must have had balls of steel, he seem to have neve inherited the protective gene of fear. Whether it is to fly a B24 without training, or jump out of it over the Austrian Alps – for the first time.

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Fun Facts: Sholem Asch

The drama 1906 God of Vengeance (Got fun nekome) takes place in a Jewish brothel and includes Jewish prostitutes, lesbians, and throwing of the Torah across the stage. The play was translated into about a dozen languages and was very controversial. It was hailed as artistic and beautiful but also as immoral and misrepresenting Jewish traditions.

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Fun Facts Friday: Henry Steele Commager

Fun Facts Friday: Henry Steele Commager

As a professional historian, Mr. Commager felt a duty to reach out to other citizens believing that an educated public would support liberal programs.

Book Review: A Hero Born (Legends of the Condor Heroes #1) by Jin Yong

Book Review: A Hero Born (Legends of the Condor Heroes #1) by Jin Yong

The Song Empire in the 13th century has lost half its territory, including the capital, to the Jurchen invaders.  While the war is raging, the peasants suffer and the great powers underestimate the Mongol warriors who are being untied by Genghis Khan.

Book Spotlight: How Fires End by Marco Rafalà

Book Spotlight: How Fires End by Marco Rafalà

A dark secret born out of World War II lies at the heart of a Sicilian American family in this emotional and sweeping saga of guilt, revenge, and, ultimately, redemption. After soldiers vacate the Sicilian hillside town of Melilli in the summer of 1943, the locals celebrate, giving thanks to their patron saint, Sebastian. Amid […]

Fun Facts Friday: Heinrich von Kleist

Fun Facts Friday: Heinrich von Kleist

Heinrich von Kleist (18, October 1777 – 21, November 1811) was a poet, novelist, writer and journalist from Germany.

Book Review: The First Stone by Carsten Jensen

Book Review: The First Stone by Carsten Jensen

A platoon of Danish soldiers, part of NATO forces, are hampered down in Afghanistan fighting the Taliban. Third platoon has a charismatic and brave leader, Schrøder, who answers to Colonel Steffensen. The two man are polar opposites.

The soldiers embark on a revenge mission, without realizing they are being set up by a traitor from within. Third platoon realizes that in war you have to make inconvenient allies, and embrace strange bedfellows just to survive the day.
If you’re lucky.

Book Review: The Second World War Illustrated by Jack Holroyd

Book Review: The Second World War Illustrated by Jack Holroyd

The book is full of pictures, many of which I have never seen, each one with an engrossing caption.

Book Review: The Binding by Bridget Collins

Book Review: The Binding by Bridget Collins

I was looking forward to reading more about the “binding”, how it worked, affected people and what is Emmett’s role in the whole magical realm the author created.

Fun Facts Friday: Elmore Leonard

Fun Facts Friday: Elmore Leonard

Elmore Leonard (11 October, 1925 – 20 August, 2013) was an American writer and screenwriter who specialized in thrillers and crime fiction.

Book Review: The Names Heard Long Ago by Jonathan Wilson

Book Review: The Names Heard Long Ago by Jonathan Wilson

The Names Heard Long Ago: How the Golden Age of Hungarian Soccer Shaped the Modern Game by Jonathan Wilson recounts how the Hungary’s changed soccer and became a powerhouse exporting players and coaches to the world.

Book Review: The First Wave by Alex Kershaw

Book Review: The First Wave by Alex Kershaw

I enjoyed this book very much, it is very easy to read and Mr. Kershaw, as usual, goes out of his way to tell big stories in an intimate way. Even though I read numerous books bout D-Day, the individual accounts in this book were refreshing and help me get a better understanding of the success of these groups.

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