Book Review: The Sweetest Fruits by Monique Truong

Instead we get different view points of what made Mr. Hearn’s voice so memorable to his fans, through tales from the women who fell by the wayside, but have had as much an impact on the writer as he had on himself.

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Fun Facts Friday: Captain Frederick Marryat

Captain Frederick Marryat (10 July, 1792 – 9 August, 1848) was a Royal Navy officer, and a novelist who pioneered historical naval fiction.

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Book Review: How to Lose the Information War by Nina Jankowicz

I have to give Ms. Jankowicz credit for not taking sides and attempting to be as bipartisan as possible. She writes about how many entities on the political spectrum in the US embrace Russian disinformation tactics to their advantage.

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Book Review: The Atlantis World by A.G. Riddle

I really enjoyed the overall premise to he series, but in this last book I’m not sure what the author wanted to convey, or if he had a trilogy planned out at all. It seemed like a bunch of story-lines thrown together for good measure, crossing fingers they would somehow work and make sense.

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Fun Facts Friday: M.F.K. Fisher

M.F.K. Fisher (3 July, 1908 – 22 June, 1992) was a food writer and translator. Ms. Fisher believed that eating well was one of the “arts of life”

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Book Review: The Revelators by Ace Atkins

The story revolves around Mexicans getting deported from a chicken plant, in an inhuman way which separates them from their children. Some children were kidnapped by gangs, getting sold to into the sex trade. What that, and several other subplots have to do with Quinn’s assassination attempt you’ll have to read for yourself.

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Book Review: The Atlantis Plague by A. G. Riddle

The second book in The Origin Mystery trilogy, a science-fiction story following a genealogist out to save the human race from the brink of extinction.

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Fun Facts Friday: Charlotte Zolotow

Charlotte Zolotow (26 June, 1915 – 19 November, 2013) was a prolific writer of children books, editor and poet. Mrs. Zolotow was a prolific children book author who did not shy away from examining difficult subjects.

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Book Review: Justice in the West Bank? by Yonah Jeremy Bob

Book Review: Justice in the West Bank? by Yonah Jeremy Bob

I really enjoyed that the author concentrated on several personalities in the system, and their interaction on high-profile cases, some which changed the way the courts worked. It is an eye opening, balanced account in which Israeli and Palestinian lawyers, as well as IDF judges sometime find themselves at odds with the security apparatus.

Fun Facts Friday: Gerhart Hauptmann

Fun Facts Friday: Gerhart Hauptmann

Gerhart Hauptmann’s first novel, The Fool in Christ, Emanuel Quint, was published in 1910. In 1912 he published the fictional book Atlantis which became a Danish silent film.  The novel told of a romance aboard a doomed ocean liner and was coincidentally written one month before the RMS Titanic sank, but released about a year later. Perceived as insensitive, the film was banned in Norway.

Book Review: Chasing the Moon by Robert Stone and Alan Andres

Book Review: Chasing the Moon by Robert Stone and Alan Andres

The book mainly fills in the blanks in the non-technical side of the moon landing, the political environment which fostered at the time, as well as how leaders at high levels encouraged or derailed the program based on their own goals and/or selfish reasons.

Book Review: An American Spy by Olen Steinhauer

Book Review: An American Spy by Olen Steinhauer

Mr. Steinhauer refuses to make this novel easy for his readers, but the relish in which he writes, creating a world full of paranoia is worth the effort.

Fun Facts Friday: Bram Stoker

Fun Facts Friday: Bram Stoker

As a member of the London Library, Mr. Stoker has access to research for Dracula. In 2018 the library discovered the books he used for research, along with notes.

Book Review: Dark Territory by Fred Kaplan

Book Review: Dark Territory by Fred Kaplan

Some fascinating stories and anecdotes are included in this book, such as the time President Ronald Reagan saw the movie War Games and asked the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff if it would be possible for a teenager to execute an attack.

Book Review: Return to the Reich by Eric Lichtblau

Book Review: Return to the Reich by Eric Lichtblau

Mr. Mayer must have had balls of steel, he seem to have neve inherited the protective gene of fear. Whether it is to fly a B24 without training, or jump out of it over the Austrian Alps – for the first time.

Fun Facts: Sholem Asch

Fun Facts: Sholem Asch

The drama 1906 God of Vengeance (Got fun nekome) takes place in a Jewish brothel and includes Jewish prostitutes, lesbians, and throwing of the Torah across the stage. The play was translated into about a dozen languages and was very controversial. It was hailed as artistic and beautiful but also as immoral and misrepresenting Jewish traditions.

Book Review: A Matter of Interpretation by Elizabeth Mac Donald

Book Review: A Matter of Interpretation by Elizabeth Mac Donald

I was impressed by the research the author has done, rich historical details lend authenticity to the story, even when the paranormal is provoked (not very often, but just right). The narrative remains plausible and the characters seem true to their historical counterparts.

Book Review: Information Wars by Richard Stengel

Book Review: Information Wars by Richard Stengel

Mr. Stengel makes an excellent case about the first part of his subtitle, but sadly the second part “what can we do about it” is not convincing. Mostly because of the government bureaucracies, slow moving administrative machinery, and simply the way democracies work.

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