Book Review: Promote Yourself: The New Rules for Career Success by Dan Schawbel

This book has aged, some of the specific advice is no longer relevant, as many are at this age where information moves so fast it changes on a monthly, weekly, daily, and even hourly basis. So it’s only expected that what was true about certain websites five years ago, is no longer so.

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Book Review: The Last Tourist by Olen Steinhauer

Milo Weaver, the reluctant spy, finds himself facing a CIA analyst about 10 years after the Department of Tourism, CIA’s silent assassins, was disbanded. The two find themselves on the run when a new breed of Tourists tries to kill them both.

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Fun Facts Friday: Howard Lindsay

Lindsay and Crouse won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for the play State of the Union (1946).

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Book Review: Captain Nemo by Kevin J. Anderson

This was a really enjoyable story, the narrative reads like a biography and not a fictional tale,

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Guest Post: 4 Books That Will Change Your Life

Words can be powerful. Most readers will know from experience that certain books and their ideas and philosophies have the ability to affect how you see the world. We have collected a handful of books that, regardless of time, age or setting, have a message that will impact your life for the better.

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Book Review: The Splendid and the Vile by Erik Larson

As a fan of the author, I had high hopes for this book. His talent of for extracting relevant, accurate, entertaining and informative information from the annals of history is something which I envy.

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Fun Facts Friday: Ovid

Ovid went to leave at the edge of the Roman Empire, by the Black Sea in Tomis (now Constanţa, Romania). As inventive as ever he learned the Getic language and wrote a poem to prize Augustus in that language.
That poem has not survived time, it probably would have been the only record of the Getic language.

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Book Review: Daughter of the Reich by Louise Fein

This novel was an easy read, and well researched. Much of the book isn’t historical per-say, which is why I don’t know if I’d categorize it as historical-fiction, but rather as a novel which takes place in the past.

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Book Spotlight: Hands Up by Stephen Clark

Book Spotlight: Hands Up by Stephen Clark

Officer Ryan Quinn, a rookie raised in a family of cops, is on the fast track to detective until he shoots an unarmed black male. Now, with his career, reputation and freedom on the line, he embarks on a quest for redemption that forces him to confront his fears and biases and choose between conscience […]

Book Review: The Tourist by Olen Steinhauer

Book Review: The Tourist by Olen Steinhauer

This novel is the full package though, it is compelling, articulate and the struggle of Milo to balance his difficult, secretive, work with the important part of his life, his family, really comes across.

Fun Facts Friday: Alain Locke

Fun Facts Friday: Alain Locke

Born as Alain Leroy Locke in Philadelphia, PA, he was the only child and a decedent of prominent families of free blacks

Guest Post: The Color of Our Sky by Amita Trasi

Guest Post: The Color of Our Sky  by Amita Trasi

Amita Trasi has a two-voice tale, moving from the past to the present and vice versa is dense, emotional, and resonates in you, even when the book has long been read. Modern India, the history of female lawlessness, childish betrayal and its atonement, there is a lot of everything.

Book Review: Somewhere in the Mediterranean by Mark Tiro

Book Review: Somewhere in the Mediterranean by Mark Tiro

Israel sometime during the 1990s, a beach is cleared for an army exercise, but one man accidentally stays there. The man witnesses a strange occurrence, a World War II refugee ship arrives.

Fun Facts Friday: Robert Pirsig

Fun Facts Friday: Robert Pirsig

Robert Pirsig (6 September, 1928) is mainly known for his book Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values in which he tells of his of motorcycle trip he and his young son Chris from Minneapolis to San Francisco. The book explores western culture and analyzes forms of philosophy. Books by Robert […]

Book Review: The Cleaner by Mark Dawson

Book Review: The Cleaner by Mark Dawson

While predictable and somewhat fragmented, this has all the makings of a good series.

Book Review: Bursts of Fire by Susan Forest

Book Review: Bursts of Fire by Susan Forest

Even though the main characters didn’t work for me, I did enjoy much of the novel regardless of a few glaring plot holes and pacing.

Fun Facts Friday: Mary Shelley

Fun Facts Friday: Mary Shelley

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (30 August, 1787 – 1 February, 1851) was an English author who is most widely known for her novel, Frankenstein. Image from http://frankensteinproject.wordpress.com/ More Books by Mary Shelley Mary’s mother died only 10 days after giving her birth. Mary didn’t have a formal education, however she made great use of her father’s […]

Book Review: Alexander the Great: His Life and His Mysterious Death by Anthony Everitt

Book Review: Alexander the Great: His Life and His Mysterious Death by Anthony Everitt

In his book, Alexander the Great: His Life and His Mysterious Death author Anthony Everitt paints of picture of his subject with all his strengths and weaknesses, showing a flawed human and not a godlike figure – as Alexander himself would have liked us to see

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