Archive for the ‘Non-Fiction’ Category

Book Review: The Art of the Political Putdown by Chris Lamb & Will Moredock

Most of these gems are well known, but I think the authors would have done well if they were more discreet, anyone can say a comeback, but there is an art in doing it like Churchill or Lincoln. Unfortunately many of today’s politicians that are quoted in this book are not anymore witty than the average middle school student, and some are less.

Book Review: Guarding Hitler: The Secret World of the Führer by Mark Felton

Hitler himself knew that many are out to kill him, he was obsessed with poising to the point where his food had to be specifically grown and was kept under constant watch by men he trusted from the moment it was picked (Hitler was a vegetarian), prepared, and plated. He even had food tasters, just in case.

Book Review: Disney’s Land by Richard Snow

Walt Disney’s attention to detail is amazing, but like many great men this part of his personality caused great concern and setbacks when it came to the park. He insisted on details being absolutely right even though no one but him and the workers will see it. Whether he was right or not depends on who you ask, personally I’m amazed at the details in the parks and could enjoy simply walking around appreciating them all without ever going on an actual ride.

Book Review: A New Genesis by Shimon Peres

His worldview and predictions for a better world shaped his speeches and willingness to compromise with militants and extremists in his own party, opposing political forces, as well as other countries. To his credit, Mr. Peres is one of the few politicians, worldwide, that even attempts to start a discussion about a “new Middle East”, a very divisive topic.

Book Review: How to Lose the Information War by Nina Jankowicz

I have to give Ms. Jankowicz credit for not taking sides and attempting to be as bipartisan as possible. She writes about how many entities on the political spectrum in the US embrace Russian disinformation tactics to their advantage.

Book Review: I Belong to Vienna by Anna Goldenberg

The book is certainly worth reading, we should not be losing this kind of history, and future generations of the author’s family will have something that many others wish they did.

Book Review: Ian Fleming’s Inspiration by Edward Abel Smith

I really liked the way this book was presented, each chapter deals with one Bond book that Fleming wrote, and which parts of it were inspired by the author’s life. Whether it’s the women, the cars, guns, or drinks the author takes the relevant parts of the book and connects them to experiences in Fleming’s life.

Book Review: Underwater by Ryan Dezember

The book goes back and forth between the author’s personal account, a look at the jaw dropping corruption which happened on a local level, as well as national, and even worldwide, implications

Book Review: Waking Up On the Appalachian Trail by N. B. Hankes

The narrative follows the author and his brother, an Army veteran and a college graduate, who decided to hike the Appalachian Trail from north to south over five months. The pair goes through their own revelations while trudging through physical difficulties which the trail offers.

Book Review: The Greatest Beer Run Ever by John “Chickie” Donohue and J. T. Molloy

If this story wasn’t true it would have been unbelievable, falling squarely under the category of “if I knew what I was doing I wouldn’t do it”, a category which I am also, proudly or not, a member of.

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