Archive for the ‘Historical Fiction’ Category

Book Review: A Lion in the Grass by Mark Zvonkovic

This was a surprising book, unlike many of the espionage novels I’ve read before. The story takes place over 70+ years in which the protagonist finds himself on the edge of history, like many of us do.

Book Review: A Quiet Madness: A biographical novel of Edgar Allan Poe by John Isaac Jones

I don’t know much about Poe’s life, besides the bullet points many people are familiar with. I thought the author did a good job re imagining his life, habits, and most of all motivations. I especially enjoyed the chapter in which Poe wrote his most famous poem “The Raven” and how it came to be.

Book Review: Comrade Koba by Robert Littell

It is unclear what role Koba plays in Stalin’s government, except that he is a very high, and admired advisor. Koba, like Stalin, also came from Georgia and, like Stalin, excuses the crimes which the regime commits as a path to a greater “worker’s paradise”. It is a very interesting exercise to explain such concepts to an audience, especially if they’re ten year olds. Koba, at points, seem to be trying to convince himself of the deeds he is a part of, instead of convincing Leon

Book Review: Pont Neuf by Max Byrd

A historical fiction story following two female reports during World War II. Annie March arrives in France, 1944 after D-Day, her mentor is Martha Gellhorn, an ace reporter, editor, who is in a troubled marriage to writer Ernest Hemingway. Annie gets to know several soldiers and takes on photography to tell her story.

Book Review: We Germans by Alexander Starritt

The grandfather, Meissner, and his exhausted companions are living a nightmare for two and a half years. Somehow barely surviving, committing war crimes and treason as they make their way back home in order to live another day

Book Review: The Exiles by Christina Baker Kline

The book was well researched and Ms. Kline brought forth historical accuracies without taking away from the narrative, something many historical fiction authors fail to do.  

Book Review: Champion: A German Boxer, a Jewish Assassin and Hitler’s Revenge by Stephen Deutsch

The book is well researched, it presents events with historical accuracy without spending time on nuances which will bog down the story. I enjoyed that the author tried to make the story flow presenting relevant facts intertwining with the narrative.

Book Review: The Sweetest Fruits by Monique Truong

Instead we get different view points of what made Mr. Hearn’s voice so memorable to his fans, through tales from the women who fell by the wayside, but have had as much an impact on the writer as he had on himself.

Book Review: While the Music Played by Nathaniel Lande

The author follows several people throughout the book, some famous, some well-known, and others are just trudging day to day trying to survive.

Book Review: The Mercies by Kiran Millwood Hargrave

I found the story to be well researched and detail enough to build a picture without hurting the narrative. The writing is very engaging, almost lyrical, but the author somehow also manages to capture the harsh life and climate.  

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