Archive for the ‘Fiction’ Category

Book Review: The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger

The story is about Henry DeTamble is a time traveler, the next evolution of humans, only that he can’t control where or when he’s going – and he can’t take anything with him and that includes clothes and even tooth fillings but he does return with the bruises and injuries he has incurred. Henry, more than often, has to rely on his criminal skills (such as pick pocketing, lock picking, etc.) and, in a Dickensian twist of circular fate, even teaches his young self those same skills.

Book Review: Casino Royale by Ian Fleming

On the surface Casino Royale by Ian Fleming seems dated. The tales of an aged Cold War spy who loves material and sexual excesses told in outdated narrative seems cliché and naïve. In fairness, however, it is a cliché the author himself created. That being said, I thought the plots and themes of the novel have stayed current.

Book Review: The Mapmaker’s Children by Sarah McCoy

I liked the stories of the women and the found the characters to be affable and smart. The author can certainly write and engaging story and I found myself to be sympathetic to the storyline.

Book Review: All You Need Is Kill by Hiroshi Sakurazaka

About: All You Need Is Kill by Hiroshi Sakurazaka is a Japanese science fiction story. The novel was made into a movie called Edge of Tomorrow, rebranded to Live, Die, Repeat when released in DVD format, but it looks like they changed it back.   230 pages Publisher: Haikasoru; Original edition Language: English ISBN-10: 1421527618 […]

Book Review: William Shakespeare’s The Phantom of Menace by Ian Doescher

I thought this book was the funniest of the bunch and I really enjoyed the illustration. Mr. Doescher wrote a witty book which made me laugh. I got some of the Shakespeare puns but not as many as I did in other books – I’m not much a Shakespeare scholar.

Book Review: Sashenka by Simon Sebag Montefiore

The novel read as if the author had access to old KGB files (maybe he did) deciphering the bureaucratic code used to hide atrocities and turn it into an amazing, gripping tale. Another outstanding work from an outstanding scholar which is well worth reading.

Book Review: The Kind Worth Killing by Peter Swanson

About: The Kind Worth Killing by Peter Swanson is a novel with enough twists for several books. The book tries to get into the head of a psychopath. The pub­lisher is giv­ing away one copy of this book  –to enter fill out the Raf­fle­copt­ter form at the end of the post. 320 pages Publisher: William Morrow […]

Book Review: Grandpa’s Mountain by Arieh Larkey

I thought this was a sweet, short book. No 12-year-old I know would use the language or vernacular you Mr. Friedman of New Jersey would use, but I understand the mechanics of trying to convey so much information to a young audience.

Book Review: All He Saw Was The Girl by Peter Leonard

The characters in the story are realistic and well written. The personalities involved are entertaining and the storyline is intriguing. There are several main characters but the author does a fine job flowing from one to the other.

Book Review: The Foundling’s War by Michel Déon

Narrowly escaping death by firing squad Jean Arnaud, a 20 year old man and his friend Palfy, a conman, are biding their time in a brothel after the French defeat in 1940. Jean falls in love with a beautiful stranger and gets into serious troubles following his heart.

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