Archive for the ‘Fiction’ Category

Book Review: Heart of Junk by Luke Geddes

This was a fun, original novel. It’s not meant to be taken seriously and the author embraces each character’s person, quirks, and stereotype.

Book Review: A Single Swallow by Ling Zhang

The first chapter or two got me interested in the concept, ghosts meeting up in a per-scheduled date and time, even though they had to wait a few decades for the meeting to cumulate fully. The narrative got slower than, but the rich language kept me going and once Ah Yan got introduced the whole story took off.

Book Review: Wolf by Herbert J. Stern and Alan A. Winter

Through Friedrich we are witnessing one of the ugliest events of the 20th century, from the front seat. Friedrich is privy to many meetings and has a personal insight into Hitler’s taking over Germany

Book Review: All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque does not glamorize war, it is not a battle zone fantasy a-la 80s Hollywood action flicks. It is a sad and sober reflection on the toll war takes on individual soldiers, their families, society, and country. In fact, the Nazis hated this book so much, and the movie, that they banned it altogether.

Guest Book Review: My Education by Susan Choi

This stylish, steamy campus novel dissects a passionate affair between a brainy ingenue and her professor’s magnetic, intellectual, incandescent wife.

Book Review: The Circus by Jonas Karlsson

The unnamed narrator and his friend, Magnus, go to the circus together. They don’t see each other often, but share the bond of outcasts and love of music. During the show, a magician asks for volunteers for his disappearing act. Magnus volunteers and never comes back.

Book Review: Apeirogon by Colum McCann

Apeirogon by Colum McCann is an extraordinary book, it’s different in narrative and structure, yet poignant and able to make its point.

Book Review: Comanche by Brett Riely

There is lots of good banter, sometimes you can’t tell if the character is saying, thinking, or just gesturing (oh, you) but the author gets the feeling across efficiently and quickly which makes the reading much more pleasurable.

Book Review: Shorefall by Robert Jackson Bennett

The sequel expands not only on world building, societies, and technologies, but also questions what the author created. He explorers the reality of politics, faith, and of course the humanity of his characters.

Book Review: Lux by Elizabeth Cook

Ms. Cook has a great narrative through biblical women, most of them do not get a voice or to tell the story through their eyes. The author takes her time to demonstrate the power of repentance that occurs in King David after he commits adultery with Bathsheba.

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