Archive for the ‘5 Stars’ Category

Book Review: Best of Enemies: The Last Great Spy Story of the Cold War by Gus Russo and Eric Dezenhall

I love a good spy novel, a great one is even better, and a great non-fiction book which reads like a great spy novel is the best.

Book Review: Otto Skorzeny: The Devil’s Disciple by Stuart Smith

It’s surprising that I’ve never heard of this man, a legend then, and it appears now as well since much of the Special Forces methodology today is based on his methods.

Book Review: Returning by Yael Shahar

This is not an easy book to read, but it’s not meant to be and is not afraid to ask difficult questions – some of which have no answers

Book Review: Samurai Castles by Jennifer Mitchellhill

The author picked 25 of Japan’s most impressive castles to write about. Each section consists of 4-6 pages, with its own map, directions, fantastic photography and explanation of what you’re looking at.

Book Review: Japan The Ultimate Samurai Guide by Alexander Bennet

About: Japan The Ultimate Samurai Guide: An Insider Looks at the Japanese Martial Arts and Surviving in the Land of Bushido and Zen by Alexander Bennet is a non-fiction book tracing the history of Samurais, their way of life, fighting styles all the way to today’s Japan. Mr. Bennett is a martial artist as awell […]

Book Review: America for Beginners by Leah Franqui

About: America for Beginners by Leah Franqui is a novel which follows a mother from India, traveling to the United States in search of her son. This is Ms. Franqui’s first novel. The publisher is giving away one (1) copy of this book – enter via the rafflecoper form at the end of the post. […]

Book Review: Foundryside by Robert Jackson Bennett

The book is very smart, the author builds a complex world, filled with multi-dimensional characters, a class system.

Book Review: The Fighters by C.J. Chivers

The author tells real stories of real soldiers that have fought in Iraq and Afghanistan, some are new to the military and others are veterans of other conflicts. Their stories are told from a humane point of view and takes into account the human factor and the toll fighting takes on one’s self and one’s family.

Book Review: Professor at Large: The Cornell Years by John Cleese

In this age, where anti-intellectualism is sadly seen as positive personality trademark by many, it’s nice to read a book which doesn’t shy from it, but embraces this aspect of humanity.

Book Review: The Middleman by Olen Steinhauer

The first thing I noticed, right off when starting to read this novel, is that it is absolutely believable and well written

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