Archive for the ‘3 Stars’ Category

Book Review: Maggie’s Wars by Phil Pisani

I did enjoy the premise of the story, which seemed to be edited heavily to the point where character development took a second seat to length. A quick, quirky read with a noir feel about a feisty lady and a soldier, both trying to make a difference out of place.

Book Review: The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

I did not know what to expect, I knew it wouldn’t be a magnificent piece of literature, but I have heard many positive reviews and several bad ones.

Book Review: Love and Treasure by Ayelet Waldman

About: Love and Treasure by Ayelet Waldman is a fictional multi-generational story. Ms. Waldman is a prolific author of fiction and non-fiction novels, essays and short stories. 352 pages Publisher: Knopf Language: English ISBN-10: 0385533543 My rat­ing for Love and Treasure — 3 Buy this book in paper or elec­tronic for­mat* More Books by Ayelet […]

Graphic Novel Review: Superman: Earth One, vol. 1 by J. Michael Straczynski

I truly enjoyed the part of the story where Clark Kent, as a young man, is searching for something interesting to do when he grows up.
Sound easy, right? After all, he can do anything, dance, sing, lead a football team.
He could probably win the World Cup all by himself.
But is that who he wants to be?

Book Review: Wolf Hunt by Armand Cabasson

Wolf Hunt: The Napoleonic Murders by Armand Cabasson takes place during the Napoleonic wars while the Austrians and the French battle over some small villages by the Danube. The mystery takes second place to the author’s impressive research of the time, whether it would be battlefield tactics or a Viennese ball.

Book Review: Human Error by Shulamit Lapid

Ruth Perlmutter, a retired Mossad agent and owner of a travel agency, has been asked to investigate the murder of Arthur, and ex-colleague from the Mossad. The death leads Ruth to investigate her colleagues, find ex-lovers and
historical letters written by Theodor Herzl (the founder of the Zionist movement).

Book Review: The Lost Art of Gratitude by Alexander McCall Smith

The Lost Art of Gratitude by Alexander McCall Smith was my first Isabel Dalhousie novel (but the sixth in the series), a philosopher who pontificates about the mundane and lives in her own private hell where every word, gesture and movement has to be thought about, absorbed and dissected.

Book Review: The Last Train to Paris by Michele Zackheim

Rose Manon is an American journalist, born in Nevada, living in New York trying hard to deal with the attitudes of the 1930s. Rose has been posted to Paris with a looming global war on everyone’s radar.

During her time Rose will deal with a lover, a country which doesn’t know what each day will bring, anti-Semitism, and her hidden identity of a Jew. Before she leaves Europe, Rose will have to make some difficult decisions which will follow her throughout her life.

Book Review: The Crying Tree by Naseem Rakha

A deeply moving, well plotted fictional book has many themes: forgiveness, redemption, belief, justice and the role of organized religion are among some of them.

Book Review: Tarzan the Terrible by Edgar Rice Burroughs

Jane has been taken by Germans soldiers and Tarzan is frantically looking for her. The fact that they are English and World War I is raging doesn’t help. Tarzan stumbles upon Pal-ul-don (Land of Men) filled with strange humans and prehistoric animals.

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