Book Review: Dirty Wars by Jeremy Scahill

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Dirty Wars: The World is a Battlefield by Jeremy Scahill is a non-fiction book, examining the policies of the United States, and the consequences, on the War on Terrorism. Mr. Scahill is an editor and journalist for online and print publications.

  • 680 pages
  • Publisher: Nation Books
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1568589549

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My rating for Dirty Wars – 4
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This is not an easy book to read, especially for a patriotic American. Dirty Wars: The World is a Battlefield by Jeremy Scahill pulls no punches, is not afraid to commend, but mainly criticize policies, politicians, and those who are at the edge of the spear implementing them.

Mr. Scahill analyzes ideology, religion and politics, not afraid to criticize policies or individuals (mostly policy makers). The author goes to great lengths into relevant history to give the reader some context about decisions made. The history delves into people, what made them who they are and how they became true believers in their own policies. Not only Americans, but Muslim clerics and radicals.

The historical background and analysis helps the author connect seemingly unrelated events and their impacts on policies and practices. The research in this book in incredible, the topics which lack media exposure are as important as ever these days.

There is a ton of information in this book, a lot of detail which is important, but sometimes masks the important questions the author brings forward.  I did not think the book was well organized, the author tries to make the information coherent, but it’s easy to get mixed up and at times gets difficult to read.

An engaging, heavy, uncomfortable yet interesting read. For those who are interested in foreign policy and international affairs, this book is a must read.

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Zohar — Man of la Book
Dis­claimer: I borrowed this book from the local library.
*Ama­zon links point to an affil­i­ate account

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