Book Review: The Rising Tide-A Novel of World War II by Jeff Shaara

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I bought this book.

My rat­ing for The Ris­ing Tide — 3

About: “The Ris­ing Tide: A Novel of World War II” by Jeff Shaara (web­site) is a his­tor­i­cal fic­tion book which blends his­tor­i­cal char­ac­ters, fact and fic­tion into a read­able story. The book is the first of a series about World War II.

  • 608 pages
  • Pub­lisher: Bal­lan­tine Books
  • ISBN: 9780345461377

Pur­chase “The Ris­ing Tide" through the ManOfLa­Book affil­i­ate account on:
Ama­zon
|Book Depos­i­tory US | Book Depos­i­tory UK

Thoughts:
“The Ris­ing Tide: A Novel of World War II” by Jeff Shaara is the first book of a series about WWII. The book explores the lesser known African cam­paign(s) which began in late1942. Mr. Shaara goes into the minds of such mil­i­tary greats as Eisen­hower, Mont­gomery and Rom­mel as well as other gen­er­als and even the men in the field.

The story moves chrono­log­i­cally to the shores of Italy and beyond fol­low­ing the day-to-day events through dif­fer­ent minds, as is the Shaara style. Even though I did not think this is Mr. Shaara's best work, I still enjoyed this book.

This is an enter­tain­ing book but I think Mr. Shaara did not do jus­tice to some of the char­ac­ter devel­op­ment as he did in sev­eral of his pre­vi­ous nov­els. I know it’s not fair to com­pare one novel to another, even if it is the same author but I’m bring­ing up the issue because I tremen­dously enjoyed pre­vi­ous works by Mr. Shaara.

How­ever…

This is the first book in a series and Mr. Shaara used it to intro­duce the play­ers. Many of the play­ers we have heard about (Eisen­hower, Mark Clark, Rom­mel, Bradley, Mont­gomery, Pat­ton) but sev­eral we did not because they were the front­line soldiers.

As a for­mer grunt, those were the sto­ries I found most inter­est­ing, the tank crew gun­ner, para­trooper and their sto­ries from the prover­bial trench. The prose is clear, and while I’m sure this book won’t sat­isfy every­one, I found it very appeal­ing with its details, maps and most of all, the after­wards where the reader is informed of what hap­pened to the non-fictional cast. While over­look­ing the roles of the navies and air­power, the story is still a pow­er­ful one and I’m look­ing for­ward to read the rest of the series.

So tell me, do you com­pare a work of an author to a sim­i­lar work he/she has writ­ten?

Syn­op­sis:
The day to day lives of the fight­ing men in the unfor­giv­ing Libyan dessert were tough. Not only fight­ing heat and exhaus­tion, but the British Army Dessert Rats, the Aus­tralians and New Zealan­ders were bat­tling the Dessert Fox (Rom­mel). Rom­mel used what he knew about other gen­er­als to his advan­tage and the results were Ger­man victories.

The story moves on to 1943 where the Allies believe that Italy will be a piece of cake and they could move on the Ger­many. Italy did sur­ren­der but the Nazis kept on fight­ing. The book ends after the bat­tles in Naples and Salerno where the Allies paid a high price for the vic­tory and the begin­ning of the plan to attack the French coast.

Pur­chase “The Ris­ing Tide" through the ManOfLa­Book affil­i­ate account on:
Ama­zon
|Book Depos­i­tory US | Book Depos­i­tory UK

Zohar — Man of la Book

Thoughts: This is the first book of a series about WWII. The book explores the lesser known African campaign(s) which began in late1942. Mr. Shaara goes into the minds of such mil­i­tary greats as Eisen­hower, Mont­gomery and Rom­mel as well as other gen­er­als and even the men in the field. The story moves chrono­log­i­cally to the shores of Italy and beyond fol­low­ing the day-to-day events through dif­fer­ent eyes, as is the Shaara style.  Even though I did not think this is Mr. Shaara's best work, I still enjoyed this book. This is an enter­tain­ing book but I think Mr. Shaara did not do jus­tice to some of the char­ac­ter devel­op­ment as he did in sev­eral of his pre­vi­ous nov­els. I know it’s not fair to com­pare one novel to another, even if it is the same author but I’m bring­ing up the issue because I tremen­dously enjoyed pre­vi­ous works by Mr. Shaara. How­ever… This is the first book in a series and Mr. Shaara used it to intro­duce the play­ers. Many of the play­ers we have heard about (Eisen­hower, Mark Clark, Rom­mel, Bradley, Mont­gomery, Pat­ton) but sev­eral we did not because they were the front­line sol­diers. Those were the sto­ries I found most inter­est­ing, the tank crew gun­ner, para­trooper and their sto­ries from the prover­bial trench. The prose is clear, and while I’m sure this book won’t sat­isfy every­one, I found it very appeal­ing with its details, maps and most of all, the after­wards where the reader is informed of what hap­pened to the non-fictional cast. While over­look­ing the roles of the navies and air­power, the story is still a pow­er­ful one and I’m look­ing for­ward to read the rest of the series. So tell me, do you com­pare a work of an author to a sim­i­lar work he/she has writ­ten? Syn­op­sis: The day to day lives of the fight­ing men in the unfor­giv­ing Libyan dessert were tough. Not only fight­ing heat and exhaus­tion, but the British Army Dessert Rats, the Aus­tralians and New Zealan­ders were bat­tling the Dessert Fox (Rom­mel). Rom­mel used what he knew about other gen­er­als to his advan­tage and the results were Ger­man vic­to­ries. The story moves on to 1943 where the Allies believe that Italy will be a piece of cake and they could move on the Ger­many. Italy did sur­ren­der but the Nazis kept on fight­ing. The book ends after the bat­tles in Naples and Salerno where the Allies paid a high price for the vic­tory and the begin­ning of the plan to attack the French coast.
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